Hall of Fame

We have inducted 63 exemplary alumni into our Alumni Hall of Fame since its inception in 2015, celebrating the accomplishments of our outstanding graduates who use their education to excel in a profession, career, or service.
Alumni Hall of Fame

With more than 15,000 ECE alumni, only a select number will be chosen as ECE Alumni Hall of Fame members, making this a truly noteworthy distinction (and membership is free).

Nomination Criteria

Nominations are based on profession and service achievement, entrepreneurship and contributions to professional societies. Examples of such noteworthy activities that would warrant a nomination may include (but are not limited to):

  • Recognized by technical organizations at a high level (e.g. IEEE fellow).
  • Significant number of influential technical publications or patents in the ECE field.
  • Successful Faculty member at a University.
  • Founded a successful small to medium business.
  • Served at the senior management level in a large corporation.
  • Recognized by a national community organization for their impact.
  • Participated at a leadership level in a nationally recognized community service organization (eg. United Way, Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity).

We encourage you to make nomimations through our online form. Alternatively, a paper nomination may be downloaded here. Should you have any questions, please contact Jan Brock (jfbright@ncsu.edu or 919.515.2067). Nominations are due by each July 31st for that year’s inductees.

Hall of Fame Inductees

Tülay Adali

Tülay Adali

Inducted in 2015

Tülay Adali received the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA, in 1992 and joined the faculty at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), Baltimore, MD, the same year. She is currently a Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

She has been very active in conference and workshop organizations. She was the general or technical co-chair of the IEEE Machine Learning for Signal Processing (MLSP) and Neural Networks for Signal Processing Workshops 2001−2008, and helped organize a number of conferences including the IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP). She has served or currently serving on numerous editorial boards and technical committees of the IEEE Signal Processing Society. She was the chair of the technical committee on MLSP, 2003−2005 and 2011−2013.

Prof. Adali is a Fellow of the IEEE and the AIMBE, a Fulbright Scholar, recipient of a 2010 IEEE Signal Processing Society Best Paper Award, 2013 University System of Maryland Regents’ Award for Research, and an NSF CAREER Award. She was an IEEE Signal Processing Society Distinguished Lecturer for 2012 and 2013. Her research interests are in the areas of statistical signal processing, machine learning for signal processing, and biomedical data analysis.



Gregory L. Booth

Gregory L. Booth

Inducted in 2016

Mr. Gregory L. Booth was born into a family with a long history of engineering, with his grandfather, father, and brother all being engineers. His unique and early exposure to electrical engineering started at the age of 12, while traveling every summer with his father to visit electric utility clients across the United States. This fostered a strong desire to become an electrical engineer, and Mr. Booth grew to admire NC State and its cutting-edge engineering programs. His desire to attend NC State was further encouraged by university staff such as Coach Al Michaels and later Drs. Herman and Stevenson when they provided assistance to his father’s engineering firm. These experiences added to his desire to become an NC State Electrical Engineering graduate and lifelong supporter of this beloved university. Mr. Booth graduated from NC State in 1969 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering. He became a principal in Booth & Associates, Inc., and grew the firm to over 80 employees serving over 300 utility clients in 30 states. After a failed attempt at retirement, Mr. Booth started PowerServices, Inc. in 2005 and has grown that firm to 70 employees with over 250 utility clients in 28 states.

Mr. Booth’s wife Catherine and three children have supported him through the good and the difficult times, as running your own business comes with many personal and business challenges. His career spans the days of slide rules then computer punch cards to the current ever-changing technology. Mr. Booth remains extremely active with clients as the President of PowerServices, performing a wide range of engineering work from traditional generation-transmission-substation-distribution line design and planning to aggressively active involvement with smart grid advancement, AMI metering, renewable energy including solar and wind, and microgrid projects.

Mr. Booth attributes his career and successes to those around him and all of his NC State experiences before and after graduation.

Engage with your professors. You have much more to learn from them than what is in a text. Substitute the word “know” for the word “no”. Engineering is finding ways to accomplish things that have never been done before. Lastly, remember: Do what you love and the money will follow.



Earl “Skip” Booth III

Earl “Skip” Booth III

Inducted in 2016

Mr. Earl H. Booth earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from NC State University in 1993. Upon graduation he began his career at IBM working in the Personal Computing and Networking Hardware divisions, establishing a strong foundation in both hardware and software engineering. In 1999, Mr. Booth joined Cisco Systems, working out of their RTP, NC campus. He continues to work there today, holding the title of Distinguished Engineer. Over his career, he has helped pioneer many of the core technologies and products across Cisco’s routing and switching portfolio. His roles have included both system architect and technical director, providing leadership for projects spanning hundreds of engineers.

Mr. Booth helps drive Cisco’s research engagements with academia as well, setting the course for future innovation, partnering with academia to enable the research and applying the results into Cisco’s product roadmap. As a part of that responsibility, Mr. Booth has remained active at NC State in the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science, working with the faculty on research initiatives, curriculum reviews, guest lectures and student internships. Mr. Booth has authored several IETF RFCs and Academic Publications and currently holds 17 Patents.



Greg E. Bottomley

Greg E. Bottomley

Inducted in 2015

Gregory E. Bottomley received the B.S. and M.S. degrees from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, in 1983 and 1985, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree from North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh, in 1989, all in electrical engineering. From 1985 to 1987 he was with AT&T Bell Laboratories, Whippany, NJ, working in the area of sonar signal processing. In 1990, he was a Visiting Lecturer at NCSU, Raleigh. From 1991 until 2009 he was with Ericsson Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC, performing research in wireless communications, including contributing to 20 journal articles, 46 conference papers and over 100 patents. In the fall of 2009, he was a Visiting Scholar at NCSU, working on the book Channel Equalization for Wireless Communications: From Concepts to Detailed Mathematics, Wiley-IEEE Press, 2011. His is currently with Northrop Grumman, Morrisville, NC.

Dr. Bottomley is an IEEE Fellow (2007). He served as an Associate Editor and then as the Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology. He also served as Technical Program Committee Co-chair for the IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference Fall 2007 as well as an IEEE Vehicular Technology Society Distinguished Lecturer. In his spare time, he composes hymn arrangements for piano.

Keep learning!



Laura J. Bottomley

Laura J. Bottomley

Inducted in 2015

Laura Bottomley, ASEE Fellow, is the Director of Women in Engineering and The Engineering Place for K-20 Outreach and a Teaching Associate Professor in the Colleges of Engineering and Education at NC State University. She teaches an Introduction to Engineering class for incoming freshmen in the College and Children Design, Invent, Create, a course for elementary education students that introduces them to engineering design and technology as well as various electrical engineering classes.

In 2009 Dr. Bottomley was selected for a Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics, Science and Engineering Mentoring by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and by the Educational Activities Board of the IEEE for an Informal Education Award. She was also inducted into the YWCA Academy of Women in 2008 for her contributions to eliminating racism and empowering women and was selected as the 2011 Woman of the Year by the RTP chapter of Women in Transportation. In 2013 she was named one of 125 Transformational Women by NC State University.

Bottomley received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical engineering from Virginia Tech in 1984 and 1985, respectively. She received her Ph.D. in electrical engineering from NC State in 1992. She has previously worked at AT&T Bell Labs on ISDN standards and Duke University teaching classes and directing a lab in the electrical engineering department.



Tom Bradicich

Tom Bradicich

Inducted in 2016

Dr. Thomas M. Bradicich is Vice President and General Manager at Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE), leading a global business unit for Servers and IoT Systems, responsible for P&L, R&D, and customer experience. He directs the four HPE Discovery Labs and IoT Innovation Labs. He received his M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering in 1983 from NC State University.

Dr. Bradicich and his team incepted HPE’s Internet of Things (IoT) strategy and launched the Edgeline™ Converged IoT Systems line. His products received an InfoWorld Technology of the Year Award, the ARM TechCon Best of Show, a CRN Product of the Year Award, an IT Brand Pulse Leader Award, and the Gartner Group Magic Quadrant.

At IBM, Dr. Bradicich was an IBM Fellow, R&D VP, and CTO for IBM’s x86 Servers. He led the design of IBM’s first notebook computer, worked on the first smart phone, led IBM’s xArchitecture™, and the IBM BladeCenter™, PureFlex™, and PureSystem™ architectures. Dr. Bradicich was elected to the IBM Academy of Technology, received the IBM CEO Award, and several management awards. He was an R&D Fellow at National Instruments, creating its big data strategy and program for product reliability and availability.

He conceived the trademarks HPE Edgeline™ Systems, IBM xArchitecture™ Systems, IBM MXT™ Memory, and National Instruments Big Analog Data™, and co-founded seven industry standards and trade associations.

Dr. Bradicich interviews regularly with the media, blogs on the business of technology and leadership, and is currently writing the book, The First Mover, discussing his experiences in business leadership and technical innovation. He delivers keynotes for industry events, received a Telly Award, two Intel Awards, holds several patents and the BSEE, MSEE, and PhD. Dr. Bradicich is on the Dean’s Advisory Board, University of Florida, and the adjunct faculty at several universities. In 2016, he was named in Computer Reseller News’ Top 25 Disruptors and Top 100 IT Executives.

When you cast a new vision and people don’t get it, don’t be discouraged, that’s a good sign. It means the idea is likely novel, and breaking new ground. That is, if everybody gets its right away, the idea is likely not that profound.



Charles L. Britt, Jr.

Charles L. Britt, Jr.

Inducted in 2016

Dr. Charles L. Britt, Jr. received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from NC State University in 1952, 1967, and 1970, respectively.

In 1952, after receiving his undergraduate degree and a commission in the U.S. Army, Dr. Britt served in the Army Signal Corps for two years as a platoon leader in charge of the 40th Infantry Division Communications Center in Korea. He then joined General Electric, where he graduated from and later supervised the Advanced Engineering Program in Philadelphia and was responsible for the re-entry vehicle (payload) of the first successful Atlas missile launch at Cape Canaveral. Dr. Britt joined the Research Triangle Institute in 1962. As a Systems Engineer, then Manager of the Systems Engineering Department, he worked on radar techniques, electronic systems, and large computer applications. His paper describing his detailed statistical analysis of aircraft collision hazards at the Atlanta terminal area won the 1971 IEEE M. Barry Carlton award.

In 1979, Dr. Britt founded and managed the RTI Virginia Office, where he worked closely with NASA, the FAA, and avionics manufacturers to develop, test, and certify the lifesaving airborne wind shear radar detection system that is now required for all U.S. commercial aircraft. For this work, he received a 1994 Laurels award from Aviation Week & Space Technology, the RTI Thanks You award, several NASA Certificates of Appreciation and Achievement Awards, as well as the NASA-Langley Research Center Guidance and Control Division’s 1990 Best Paper award for his publication in the AIAA Journal of Aircraft.

Other NASA-sponsored projects that he led or collaborated on included developing new methods for calculating radar cross sections (low-observables), remote sensing from satellites, and measuring characteristics of aircraft wake vortices using a pulsed 2-micron coherent lidar.

Dr. Britt retired from RTI in 2006. A proud father, grandfather, and great-grandfather, his interests have also included flying, sailing, model aviation, astronomy, photography, amateur radio, and particle physics.



April S. Brown

April S. Brown

Inducted in 2017

April S. Brown received her B.S.E.E. in 1981 from North Carolina State University, and her M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1984 and 1985.

Her career of just over thirty years has included positions in industry, university, and the government. She started her career as an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan in 1985 and joined the Hughes Research Laboratories in 1986 as a Member of the Technical Staff. When she left HRL in 1994 she held the position of Sr. Scientist after holding the positions of Section Head and Project Manager. In addition, she was a Program Manager in the Physics Division at the Army Research Office (ARO) in 1988-1989. She joined Georgia Tech as an Associate Professor in 1994 and held the position of the Pettit Professor in Microelectronics when she left in 2002 to join Duke University. She also served as Associate Dean in the College of Engineering at Georgia Tech from 1999-2001, and Executive Assistant to the President from 2001-2002.

She is currently the John Cocke Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Duke University and holds a secondary appointment in Biomedical Engineering. She served as Department Chair in ECE at Duke from 2002-2006 and Sr. Associate Dean for Research from 2007-2011. She recently held the position of Senior Scientist in the Engineering Sciences Directorate at ARO for 2 years.

Her research focus is on the synthesis and design of electronic materials for devices and the properties of hybrid semiconductor-based nanostructures. She is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.



P. Mark Buff III

P. Mark Buff III

Inducted in 2016

Dr. P. Mark Buff, III is the founder and President of Mohu, a Consumer Electronics Company located in the heart of Raleigh. Mohu develops cutting-edge wireless solutions and products for free live TV, multimedia streaming and high definition markets and is leading the “Cord Cutting Revolution”. Since its flagship product was launched in 2011, the Mohu Leaf has become the best-selling, #1 rated paper-thin HDTV Antenna and can be found in all major retail outlets such as Walmart, Sam’s Club, Amazon, and Best Buy.

Prior to entering the Consumer Electronics space, Dr. Buff spent many years working on various military Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) defeat and neutralization initiatives, ranging from Robot Operator Control Unit (OCU) arrays to “no-profile” antenna systems for military ground vehicles.

Dr. Buff received his Bachelor of Science and Doctorate degrees in Electrical Engineering from NC State in 1994 and 2006, respectively, and his Master of Science degree in Computer Engineering from NC State in 2003. Dr. Buff is married and has four children.



Mark Carter

Mark Carter

Inducted in 2016

Mr. Mark Carter received his Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from NC State University in 1987. He has over 30 years professional experience in design, installation and project management in mission critical systems including various Department of Defense and Federal Aviation Administration federal government facilities.

Mr. Carter founded Wells Global in 1999 and serves as General Manager. Wells Global is a full-service design/build company specializing in critical power system design and installation, with specific emphasis on Emergency Standby Power Systems with Engine Generators, Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) equipment and Lightning Protection and Grounding systems. Mr. Carter is a member of the Rotary Club of Raleigh and a former board member of the Wake Tech Community College Foundation’s Fostering Bright Futures.



Christos Christodoulou

Christos Christodoulou

Inducted in 2016

Dr. Christos Christodoulou received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from North Carolina State University in 1981 and 1985, respectively. He served as a faculty member in the University of Central Florida, Orlando, from 1985 to 1998. In 1999, he joined the faculty of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of the University of New Mexico (UNM), where he served as the Chair of the Department from 1999 to 2005. Dr. Christodoulou is a Fellow member of IEEE, and a Distinguished Professor at UNM.

Currently, he is the Associate Dean for Research for the School of Engineering at UNM, and the director of COSMIAC (Configurable Space Microsystems Innovations & Applications Center) that deals with Space Electronics. He was appointed as an IEEE AP-S Distinguished Lecturer (2007-2010) and served as an associate editor and special issue editor for the IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation for several years, has given several keynote and invited talks, all over the world, has published over 500 papers in journals and conferences, and has co-authored 8 books.

Dr. Christodoulou is the recipient of the 2010 IEEE John Krauss Antenna Award for his work on reconfigurable fractal antennas using MEMS switches, the Lawton-Ellis Award, and the Gardner Zemke Professorship at the University of New Mexico.

You are lucky to be in one of the premier engineering programs in the US and in one of the most beautiful parts of the country. Study hard, take pride in your work, do not let failures dampen your enthusiasm, stay focused, make friends, and help the less fortunate.



James F.  Collins

James F. Collins

Inducted in 2018

James Frank Collins received a Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in electrical engineering from NC State University in 1964 and 1966, respectively.

Jim then became an officer in the U.S. Navy after graduating from the Naval Officers Candidate School located at the U.S. Naval Base in Newport, Rhode Island. For the next two years, he served as a Contracts Administrator at the Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, North Carolina. From December 1968 to November 1969, he fought in the Vietnam War while stationed in Danang, Republic of South Vietnam with the Navy Seabees supporting the U.S. Marines.

After being discharged from the Navy, Jim moved to California and worked as a hardware design engineer for 14 years at ARGOSystems, a supplier of ELINT (Electronic Intelligence) and COMINT (Communications Intelligence) gathering equipment.

Jim then conceived of and co-founded Applied Signal Technology which soon became the premier supplier of strategic and tactical telecommunications reconnaissance and processing equipment for the U.S. military and U.S. intelligence agencies. AST, headquartered in Sunnyvale, California, pioneered the use of digital signal processing to implement that equipment. While at AST, Jim and his daughter, Sarah, also an AST hardware engineer with her Bachelor and Master’s degrees from Stanford, hosted Dr. Tom Miller and his NC State University Entrepreneurship students on several occasions. Jim always encouraged the students to take career chances or “opportunities” by joining start-up companies or by starting their own.

After AST reached approximately 700 employees in 2011, Raytheon, the fourth largest defense contractor at that time, purchased AST. In 2015, Raytheon dedicated the James Frank Collins Museum in Sunnyvale, California which displays many of the equipment that Jim and AST built. Jim remains a part-time consultant with Raytheon AST.

Jim and his wife, Danna, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in June 2017. While maintaining their permanent residence in Sunnyvale, CA, they spend much of their time in their home on the island of Sunset Beach, North Carolina.



Edward Randy Collins, Jr.

Edward Randy Collins, Jr.

Inducted in 2016

Dr. Edward Randolph Collins, Jr. is a native of Rockingham NC. In 1984, he earned the Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering magna cum laude from NC State University. Dr. Collins earned a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 1989 from Georgia Tech, with a focus in power electronics and machines. In 1989, he joined the faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Clemson University, and currently holds the rank of Professor. Dr. Collins has taught widely at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and supervised numerous graduate students. He has received numerous awards for teaching, including both of the College of Engineering and Science’s top teaching awards. Dr. Collins has been active in online education as well, and was recognized with Clemson University’s Ralph D. Elliott Endowed Award for Off-Campus and Distance Education in 2015.

Dr. Collins’ research has focused on power quality and the compatibility between the power grid and connected devices. Years of research has culminated in the world’s largest electric grid emulator, called the Duke Energy “Electrical Grid Research Innovation and Development” (eGRID) center, which enables compatibility testing at power levels up to 15MW. His work in the power quality area has resulted in two issued patents, and another patent pending. Additionally, Dr. Collins received several prize paper awards for his research work, including from the IEEE Power and Energy Society.

Since 2008, Dr. Collins has served in leadership capacities at Clemson. From 2008 – 2014, he served as Associate Dean for Undergraduate and International Studies in the College of Engineering and Science. In 2012, he was selected as a Fellow of the American Council on Education, and spent 2012-2013 on an ACE fellowship at Virginia Tech. In 2014, Dr. Collins was named the Executive Director of Academic Initiatives, where he coordinates new and expanding academic programs. In this capacity, he leads Clemson’s new graduate-level engineering and computing expansion in Charleston SC.



Joseph S. Colson, Jr.

Joseph S. Colson, Jr.

Inducted in 2015    Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award in 2001

Joseph S. Colson, Jr. earned his bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering from North Carolina State University in 1968 and his master’s degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1969.

He began his career with Bell Laboratories and served in numerous positions until becoming president of the AT&T Affiliates sales division.

He was one of the founding leaders of Lucent Technologies, ultimately serving as president of International Regions and Professional Services until his retirement in 1998. Under his leadership, Lucent became one of the leaders of the industry.

He has remained active in engineering at NC State and serves on the Board of Directors of the NC State Engineering Foundation. He made a significant contribution to the College by establishing the Dr. Joseph S. Colson Engineering Scholarship in his father’s memory. He has received numerous honors, including an honorary doctorate of humanities from North Carolina A&T State University and honors from Black Enterprise magazine and Black Engineer magazine for his professional achievements.



Wesley B. Covell

Wesley B. Covell

Inducted in 2015

Wesley B. (Wes) Covell is vice president of Middle East Business Development for Harris Corporation. In this role, Wes is responsible for driving top line growth and capturing large, multi-year opportunities. Additionally, he serves as the managing director of Harris Atlas Systems, LLC, a joint venture between Harris Corporation and Atlas Telecom, a United Arab Emirates-based technology leader.

Previously, Wes was vice president of Growth Markets, and was responsible for strategic direction and oversight for international growth initiatives. Earlier, he was vice president of Strategy and chief growth officer for Harris Corporation and was responsible for the Emerging Business Opportunities initiative and the corporation’s strategic growth plan.

Since joining Harris, Wes has held positions of increasing responsibility, including president of the Defense Programs business, division vice president of engineering, vice president in the corporate technology group, and vice president of engineering for the Defense Programs business. Before joining Harris in 1990, Covell was a systems engineer with The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, working on communications systems for the U.S. Navy and Army.

He earned a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering from North Carolina State University and a master’s degree in electrical engineering from The Johns Hopkins University.

I encourage you to build a strong foundation of skills and values. When you encounter life’s inevitable change events, embrace them, learn from them, and grow from them. If you do, you will be well positioned for a lifetime of challenge, growth and success.



Teresa A. Dahlberg

Teresa A. Dahlberg

Inducted in 2017

Teresa Abi-Nader Dahlberg has been Professor of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science and Dean of the College of Engineering & Computer Science at Syracuse University since 2015. She was previously Dean of the Albert Nerken School of Engineering and the Chief Academic Officer of The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. Dr. Dahlberg led creation of interdisciplinary programs that span art, design, technology, and science.

Prior to Cooper, Dr. Dahlberg was Associate Dean of the College of Computing and Informatics at the University of North Carolina (UNC) Charlotte. At Charlotte, she established the Wireless Networking Research Lab and the Diversity in Information Technology Institute. She co-founded the STARS Computing Corps, a National Science Foundation alliance for broadening participation. As STARS Director Dr. Dahlberg led creation of a service-learning program intended to strengthen the K-12 and undergraduate STEM pipeline and oversaw adoption of the program by 50 colleges and universities nationwide (2006-2013). She also used STARS to inspire Prospect for Success--a university-wide program to engage freshman around intentionality, curiosity, and awareness.

Teresa has been principle investigator or co-PI for over $20 million in research grants. She served on the Advisory Committee to the National Science Foundation Computer & Information Science & Engineering (CISE) Directorate from 2011 to 2014, and she co-chaired the CISE Education Workforce subcommittee during this time. Teresa has been a technology consultant and expert witness, with clients including the National Security Agency, Netflix, JP Morgan Chase, LG Electronics and Nokia. Teresa has an M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Engineering from North Carolina State University (1990 and 1993 respectively). She spent ten years as a development engineer for IBM before joining academia.



Marion Casey Dean

Marion Casey Dean

Inducted in 2016

Mr. Marion Casey Dean served as CEO of M.C. Dean for 22 years and Vice President for 11 years. During this time, Casey transitioned M.C. Dean, Inc. from a local electrical contractor to a regional leader in electrical, communications, security, and complex integrated electronic systems construction. Industry-leading capabilities in the design, installation and support of complex systems made M.C. Dean the choice for federal government, local government, corporate and institutional clients’ most complex projects.

Devoted to workforce development, Mr. Dean developed two of the region’s first electrical apprenticeship programs in the 1960s, first in Virginia and then in Washington, DC. Mr. Dean was instrumental to these programs, developing the course itineraries and also teaching classes. Additionally, the program was opening new doors of opportunity within the community, recruiting inner-city and female apprentices, two previously underrepresented groups.

Both of these programs are thriving today, and M. C. Dean still leads this type of training as well as its own M. C. Dean University, which trains M.C. Dean’s engineers and technicians in the various technologies required in specialty fields.

Casey presently resides in Sarasota, Florida with his wife Deborah, a retired teacher. He has 3 sons. His oldest, Bill Dean, is an NC State graduate in Electrical Engineering and is CEO & President of M.C. Dean, Inc. Under Bill’s leadership, M.C. Dean has expanded its capabilities globally and become the nation’s premier electrical design-build and systems integration firm for complex, mission critical facilities. Eric Dean, his middle son, is an Electrical Engineer with a Masters in Telecommunications from University of Maryland. Eric is the Chief IT Officer for M.C. Dean, Inc. Casey’s youngest son, Geoffrey Dean, is presently pursuing his PHO at the University of Illinois.



William H. Dean

William H. Dean

Inducted in 2015    Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award in 2011

William H. Dean is the Chief Executive Officer of M.C. Dean, the nation’s expert provider of electronic systems integration and electrical and telecommunications systems engineering, specialty construction, and operations and maintenance. With a staff of more than 3,500, the firm has a reputation for excellence and expertise resultant from its large contingent of engineers and technicians, many of whom are recognized industry experts. M.C. Dean has a global presence, having performed work on five continents and over 40 countries from its 25 offices in North America, Europe, and the Middle East.

Under Dean’s leadership, M.C. Dean has grown twentyfold in annual revenues. More than 95% of this growth has been organic, the result of the firms outstanding, long term staff and its focus on the retention and development of existing clients and the expansion of service offerings within its core electrical, telecommunications, and electronic systems market. Today, M.C. Dean specializes in the lifecycle delivery of a diverse range of multi-disciplined technical solutions, from VSAT IP satellite networks, to command and control systems, to fiber to the home (FTTH) networks, and to mission critical power systems.

Dean is actively involved in numerous industry organizations including the Design-Build Institute of America, the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, the Building Industry Consulting Service International (BICSI), and the American Society of Industrial Security. He has a leadership role on a variety of boards and councils related to technical education, workforce development, and entrepreneurship. Among these are the D.C. Workforce Investment Council, the D.C Apprenticeship Council and he served on the 2010 Board of the Washington Airports Task Force. Mr. Dean is also a periodic guest lecturer at Georgetown University.

Dean holds a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from NC State University.



Michael Devetsikiotis

Michael Devetsikiotis

Inducted in 2017

Michael Devetsikiotis was born in Thessaloniki, Greece. He received the Diploma degree in Electrical Engineering from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, in 1988, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from NC State University, in 1990 and 1993, respectively.

In 1993, he joined the Department of Systems and Computer Engineering at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada, as a Post-Doctoral Fellow. He became a tenure track Assistant Professor in 1996, and an Associate Professor and Department Associate Chair in 1999.

Dr. Devetsikiotis returned to the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at NC State as an Associate Professor in 2000, and became a Professor in 2006. He served as the coordinator of the Master of Science in Computer Networking program until 2011, when he became the ECE Director of Graduate Programs, managing one of the largest graduate ECE programs in the country with over 800 students. On August 1, 2016, he joined the University of New Mexico as a Professor and Chair of the ECE Department.

Dr. Devetsikiotis joined the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) as a Student Member in 1985, and he became a Fellow in 2012. He has served as Chairman of the IEEE Communications Society Technical Committee Communication Systems Integration and Modeling, and as a member of the IEEE ComSoc Education Board. Between 2008 and 2011 he was an IEEE ComSoc Distinguished Lecturer.



Wesley O. Doggett

Wesley O. Doggett

Inducted in 2017

Wesley Osborne Doggett, 82, peacefully passed away on Sunday, December 22, 2013, at his home in Raleigh, NC. He was an Eagle Scout and Reidsville High School graduate. While a senior at NC State, he decided to double major in engineering. He took 27 credit hours of 400-level classes in a single semester, all in absentia due to his military commitments and earned a perfect 4.0 grade point average. He received dual BS degrees from NC State in Nuclear Engineering (1952 with High Honors) and Electrical Engineering (1953, in absentia). Dr. Doggett received the NC State Physics Department's Outstanding Student Award in 1952 and was selected to be the "Outstanding Engineering Senior" in Electrical Engineering.

Professor Doggett was awarded two of the first pre-doctoral fellowships by the newly created National Science Foundation that supported his initial graduate studies at University of California at Berkeley during 1952-54. He earned his Master's and PhD in Physics from UC-Berkeley in three and one-half years. He studied under four Nobel Prize Laureates, Professors Luis Alvarez, Emilio Segré, Owen Chamberlain, and Edwin McMillan, in addition to Professor Edward Teller. During 1956-58, he served as a commissioned officer with the Air Force Nuclear Engineering Test Reactor project office at the Wright Air Development Center at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio. He became its Technical Project Coordinator and received the Air Force Commendation Medal in 1957. In 1958 he joined the Physics Department at NC State, became a full professor in 1962, served as Assistant Dean of Physical and Mathematical Sciences College from 1964-1968, and retired as Professor Emeritus of Physics in 1993. After retiring, he was an associate editor of the Cornelius Lanczos Collected Published Papers with Commentaries (1999).

Professor Doggett was a member of the NC State's Academy of Outstanding Professors. Professor Doggett was known for his research in plasma physics at NC State. However, what he enjoyed most was teaching.



Nick England

Nick England

Inducted in 2018

Nick England graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from NC State University in 1969. After working for a few years, he returned to NC State to take EE graduate courses and became a Research Assistant in Professor John Staudhammer’s computer graphics lab. There he discovered a talent for digital hardware design and a passion for interactive computer graphics and image processing. In 1978, instead of finishing his Ph.D., he and Mary Whitton started Ikonas Graphics Systems, based on Nick’s research at NCSU, creating a programmable raster graphics processor system which was the forerunner of today’s GPGPUs. After Ikonas was acquired by Adage Inc, Nick spent several years as Adage’s VP of Graphics Technology until leaving to found Trancept Systems with Tim Van Hook and Mary Whitton – creating a programmable graphics/imaging processor to plug into Sun Microsystems workstations. After Trancept was acquired by Sun Microsystems, Nick spent several years as their Director of Visualization and Imaging Products. In 1993 he joined UNC Chapel Hill’s Computer Science Department as a Research Professor, working on the PixelFlow massively parallel graphics system. During this time he served on several local company and national technical association boards of directors. In 2000 he left UNC to form 3rdTech Inc., commercializing several graphics/imaging technologies developed at the University. In 2015, he finally quit trying to create new products and start new companies, and today enjoys documenting the history of US Naval Communications and restoring vintage Navy radio and teletype equipment .



John M. Eubanks

John M. Eubanks

Inducted in 2015

John M. Eubanks received his BS and MS degrees in Electrical Engineering from NCSU in 1956 and 1962. In 1966 Eubanks, and Robert Bedingfield, started Computer Labs, a company in Greensboro, NC. Bedingfield handled the business end of the company and Eubanks lead the product development. Computer Labs developed and sold analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters and related items. The analog-to-digital converter that was offered was the fastest available anywhere at that time. The company was very successful. In 1978 Analog Devices bought Computer Labs. For a time the company was operated as Computer Labs Division of Analog Devices. Eventually it became Analog Devices – Greensboro Division. This company is still in operation today and has about 300 employees.

Since leaving Computer Labs, Eubanks has spent much of his time teaching math at Nash Community College where he received the outstanding teacher award for 2004. He retired from teaching at age 80. He lives in Rocky Mount, NC with his wife, Sue Fowlkes Eubanks. They have 4 children and 6 grandchildren.



Lynn W. Eury

Lynn W. Eury

Inducted in 2016

Mr. Lynn W. Eury, a North Carolina native, graduated from North Carolina State University in 1959 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering and completed the Harvard Business School’s Advanced Management Program in 1986. He is a registered professional engineer in North Carolina and formerly held registration in South Carolina.

Mr. Eury began his career with Carolina Power & Light Company (CP&L) in 1959. Early career assignments included engineering, installation, and testing of control systems for CP&L’s power grid, and he ultimately achieved the level executive vice-president and member of the board of directors in 1989.

After retiring from CP&L in 1994, he was elected to the PJM Interconnection, Board of Managers. During his fifteen years of service, he always held a lead Board role. Mr. Eury holds the grade of Fellow in the Professional Engineers of North Carolina and the National Society of Professional Engineers. Mr. Eury is a Senior Life Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers and has been awarded the Centennial Medal and the Third Millennium Medal for outstanding achievements.

Mr. Eury has served on the NC State Engineering Foundation and the NC State Foundation. He also has served on the NC State Alumni board having the former role of president. He was one of the key leaders associated with the planning and construction of the Dorothy and Roy Park Alumni Center. Mr. Eury has also held positions of leadership at several other institutions of higher education. He and his wife, Faye, have endowed educational scholarships at several institutions.

Mr. Eury has received NCSU’s Watauga Medal, Menscer Cup, and Alumni Association Meritorious Service Award. He has been named an honorary citizen of Beaufort, NC and presented a key to the Town for his role in that community.

There are three attributes that will make you successful in your career. You must thoroughly understand the work for which you are responsible and be able to execute that work effectively and efficiently. You must understand the importance of managing your work. You must have and use systems to plan, organize and control the work process. Your relationship with people may well be the most important.



Cataldo U. Falco

Cataldo U. Falco

Inducted in 2015

Working for RCA, Cataldo “Tal” Falco helped develop the first large screen color television. The system used a variety of new technologies which ultimately became the standard for all color television for decades to come. Falco also participated in development of precision radar and led design of digital controls and readouts, simpler and more accurate.

As manager of Aerojet Corporation’s Microwave Division, Falco assembled a team and directed the development and first space use of microwave radiometry for weather, ocean and land observation (fulfilling my vision and that of Dr. William Nordberg, NASA). This required extensive research in microwave radiometry theory. Microwave signatures were identified for atmospheric and geographic elements. A new electrically scanning microwave antenna, solid state Dicke switch (the ultimate standard for calibration), gallium arsenide diodes, and mixer for 60 GHz radiometer were developed. Falco designed software for analysis of global weather including temperature and water vapor at various altitudes, ocean temperatures and ice thickness, among others, and pseudo-color displays for data presentation.

Finally, at System Development Corp. (later Burroughs) Falco led a team that designed the first internet for NSA incorporating security at all levels. He led the design of the first complete version of TCP/IP and other internet protocols and gateways (predecessors to today’s routers).

In my career I took many risks. They resulted in my participation in many exciting engineering advancements. Do not be afraid to take risks. Work toward a career you find personally satisfying and professionally rewarding. As you advance in your career make time for yourself and your family and friends.



Excell O. Ferrell III

Excell O. Ferrell III

Inducted in 2016

Mr. Excell O. Ferrell, III was raised and attended public schools in Durham County. He entered the School of Engineering at NC State in the fall of 1962, graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering in 1966.

Upon graduation from NC State, Mr. Ferrell began his work career at Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock for a brief period of time before entering the US Army. He served in the US Army from 1967 until 1969. In 1970 he began working with Duke Power Company. Over a 36-year career, he worked in various capacities and ultimately served as Senior Vice President of Electric Distribution from 1997 until 2003. After retirement from Duke Energy, Mr. Ferrell assumed the position of President and CEO of Grand Bahama Power Company, an investor owned electric utility serving Grand Bahama Island in the Bahamas. Mr. Ferrell retired from Grand Bahama Power Company in 2009.

During his career, Mr. Ferrell has been involved in a number of professional and civic organizations. Among those are Chairman Southeastern Electric Exchange Engineering and Operations committee member, Board of Directors Charlotte Chamber of Commerce, member of the NC State Alumni Board of Directors, a Board of Director and Past Chairman of the NC State Engineering Foundation, member North Carolina Environmental Management Commission and member Greensboro Rotary Club.

Mr. Ferrell married Paula Barnes of Jacksonville, NC in 1970. They have two children, Christopher Scott Ferrell and Elizabeth Blair Ferrell. Christopher is a 1997 NC State ECE graduate.



Oscar N. Garcia

Oscar N. Garcia

Inducted in 2017

Born in Havana, Cuba, Dr. Oscar N. Garcia was Valedictorian at Havana High School, enrolled in Electrical Engineering at Havana University until its political closure, transferred to NC State, where he received his BS with honors and MSEE, became a US citizen in 1965, and received his PhD from the University of Maryland in 1969.

His career started at IBM Glendale Development Labs from where he was recruited by his Dean from State, Dr. Harold Lampe, who was starting a College of Engineering at Old Dominion University. Dr. Garcia also taught at the University of South Florida (founding the BS, MS, and PhD programs in Computer Science), The George Washington University, and became NSF’s HCI Program Director. He held the NCR Endowed Chair of Computer Science and Engineering at Wright State University, and was Founding Dean of the College of Engineering at the University of North Texas where he currently is EE Professor. Dr. García was elected national President of the IEEE Computer Society, served in the IEEE BoD, and is a Fellow of the IEEE and AAAS.

Additional honors include the IEEE Computer Society’s Merwin Distinguished Service Award, the IEEE Emberson Award “for outstanding contributions to the technical and educational objectives of the IEEE,” an IEEE Third Millennium Medal, and the Centennial Certificate of the ASEE “for exceptional contributions to the ASEE and the profession of Engineering.”

His published/research interests have been in Computer Architecture, Coding Theory, Artificial Intelligence, Speech Recognition, and recently Quantum Computing.



Buster C. Glosson

Buster C. Glosson

Inducted in 2016

Lt. General Buster Glosson, USAF (Ret.) was born in Greensboro, North Carolina. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from North Carolina State University in 1965 and was commissioned as a distinguished graduate and second lieutenant through the NC State Air Force ROTC program.

General Glosson flew over 100 combat missions in Vietnam. He commanded the Air Force F-4 Fighter Weapon’s Squadron. He was the Commander of two Tactical Fighter Wings. Preceding the first Gulf War, he served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (Legislative Affairs). During the Gulf War, General Glosson was the “architect of the Gulf Air War”, he used precision weapons and stealth technology as the foundation for all Air War planning, “a first in the history of warfare.” Additionally, he commanded over 600 combat aircraft and 12,000 combatants.

After the Gulf War, General Glosson served as Director, Air Force Legislative Liaison. He culminated his military service as the Air Force Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, Plans and Requirements; where he was responsible for day-to-day worldwide operations, strategic planning and weapon system requirements. During this period, General Glosson led the design and development of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. Concurrently, he was the Air Force Operations Deputy to the Chairman of the Joint Chief of Staff; where he recommended to the President the air assets necessary to support our Nation’s National Security Objectives and Military Strategy.

Following his retirement from the US Air Force, General Glosson activities have included: Member of CIA Director’s Advisory Board; Member of the BOD for a Restaurant Chain, Manufacturing Companies and Lynnwood Foundation; Member of Myers Park Methodist Church Administrative Board and Member of NCSU Chancellor’s Advisory Committee.

General Glosson is the author of “War with Iraq (Critical Lessons)”. He and his wife, Vicki, are the parents of a son, Brad, and a daughter, Tanya.



Edward D. Graham, Jr.

Edward D. Graham, Jr.

Inducted in 2015

Edward Demah Graham, Jr. was born in Clarksdale, MS, and earned his doctorate in electrical engineering from North Carolina State University in 1970 under Professor John R. Hauser. He also received a BS in EE from Mississippi State University and an MS in EE from University of New Mexico (UNM). After studies at NC State, Graham returned to Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque where he worked for 32 years retiring as Director of Operations and Engineering.

During his tenure at Sandia, Graham made contributions in semiconductor devices and circuits, IC testing, radiation effects, and semiconductor reliability as well as management and leadership in several other technical arena. While at Sandia, he published two books, several papers and became a registered professional engineer (PE). He was also a twenty-year member of the GOMAC Committee, twice as Chair. Dr. Graham left Sandia to become President and CEO of SEMI-SEMATECH in Austin, TX which he ultimately merged with SEMI in San Jose, CA. Graham continues to consult, through SEMI, to the global silicon industry, leading SEMI’s Silicon Manufacturers’ Group. In the early 2000’s, Ed returned to the University of New Mexico to pursue a doctorate in Mathematics and Statistics; shortly thereafter he was invited to teach a wide range of courses in the ECE Department at UNM. In 2009 he was named Outstanding Teacher in ECE at UNM. Graham’s teaching continues through fall semester of 2015 where upon he will retire.



Christina M. Hammock

Christina M. Hammock

Inducted in 2015

Christina M. Hammock attended NC State University where she earned a BS in Electrical Engineering (2001), a BS in Physics and a MS in Electrical Engineering (2002). She graduated from the NASA Academy program at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in 2001. She worked as an Electrical Engineer in the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics at GSFC from 2002 to 2004. Hammock was selected in June 2013 as one of eight members of the 21st NASA astronaut class. Her Astronaut Candidate Training included scientific and technical briefings, intensive instruction in International Space Station systems, Extravehicular Activity (EVA), robotics, physiological training, T-38 flight training, and water and wilderness survival training. She completed astronaut candidate training in July 2015, and is now qualified for future assignment.

Hammock’s special honors include: NASA Group Achievement Award, NASA Juno Mission Jupiter Energetic Particle Detector Instrument, 2012; Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Invention of the Year nominee, 2009; United States Congress Antarctic Service Medal with Winter-Over distinction, 2005; NASA Group Achievement Award, NASA Suzaku Mission X-ray Spectrometer Instrument, 2005; Astronaut Scholar, Astronaut Scholarship Foundation, 2000 to 2001.

As you make life's big decisions, always take the path that leaves the most doors open and that is closest to the life you have imagined for yourself. Also, never miss the chance to pursue what you are passionate about. If you do so, you will work hard to be extraordinary and that will lead to your achievement of what is truly rewarding.



John R. Hauser

John R. Hauser

Inducted in 2015

John R. Hauser received the B. S. degree in Electrical Engineering from North Carolina State University in 1960 and the M. S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Duke University in 1962 and 1964 respectively. After employment at Bell Telephone Laboratories and the Research Triangle Institute, Durham NC, he joined the faculty at North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC in September, 1966 where he was a Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Dept until his retirement in 2007. At NCSU he has held positions of Interim Dept. Head, Director in 1994-1995 and 2001-2002 plus Director of the Solid State Electronics Laboratory and Director of the NSF Center for Advanced Electronic Materials Processing. From 1998 to 2001 he was the Director of the SRC/SEMATECH Front End Processes Research Center.

At NCSU his research interests centered around semiconductor materials and devices with a strong interest in semiconductor device modeling. He has published over 180 articles and two books in technical areas of his research. His awards include the Alcoa Foundation Distinguished Research Award at NCSU in 1978, the R. J. Reynolds Industries, Inc. Award for Excellence in Teaching, Research and Extension at NCSU in 1982, the Semiconductor Industry Association University Research Award in 2002 and the Alexander Quarles Holladay Metal at NCSU in 2003.



Clayton Scott Hinnant

Clayton Scott Hinnant

Inducted in 2015

After earning a BS – Electrical Engineering degree from North Carolina State University in 1968, Scotty Hinnant achieved the position of Senior Vice-President and Chief Nuclear Officer at a large US electric utility company that owned and operated a fleet of five nuclear units. Accomplishments were based on strong technical and business qualifications and hands-on expertise and experience in engineering, construction, startup testing, strategic planning, business unit development, and performance improvement of nuclear power plants.

After retirement, his executive experience has been utilized through a consulting business to perform independent safety reviews of operating nuclear power plants, and to advise US and international organizations constructing or considering the construction of new nuclear power plants.

I am from a poor Eastern NC family and attended a small rural public high school. These factors did not prevent me from receiving a BS-Electrical Engineering degree from a great university. It is most often the focus, motivation, and determination that determine whether you make it through both the educational and business worlds. Stay focused and you can be successful!



Irwin R. Holmes

Irwin R. Holmes

Inducted in 2015    Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award in 2014

Irwin R. Holmes Jr. received a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering from North Carolina State University in 1960. He was the first African-American to receive an undergraduate degree from the university. He went on to earn a master’s degree in electrical engineering from Drexel University.

After graduation from NC State, Holmes worked for several companies before taking a position with IBM, where he worked for 19 years until his retirement. As a senior manager of computer development at IBM, he earned two patents and was a key member of the task force that led to the development of the IBM PC product line. Holmes has also been an entrepreneur and he developed a shopping center in Durham, NC, started a gourmet restaurant, and developed other real estate ventures.

As one of a handful of African-American students who took those first bold steps to desegregate universities in the South, Holmes helped open the doors to generations of students to come and ensure that they had access to higher education. Holmes was a scholar and had high academic achievement. He was inducted into the electrical engineering honor society, Eta Kappa Nu, in his junior year. He was also an athlete and ran track, played intramural basketball and varsity tennis. Holmes was the first athlete to integrate the Atlantic Coast Conference and in his senior year he was made co-captain of the tennis team.

Holmes has stayed involved with the university, supporting the NC State Engineering Foundation and the university’s Minority Engineering Programs. The Irwin Holmes and Black Alumni Society Conference Room on the Centennial Campus was named in his honor.



Tim Humphrey

Tim Humphrey

Inducted in 2018

Timothy Humphrey currently serves as Vice President, IBM Chief Data Office and as the Senior State Executive for IBM in North Carolina and Senior Location Executive for IBM in Research Triangle Park, here in North Carolina and one of the company’s largest sites. Previously, Tim held various IBM executive roles spanning Analytics, Artificial Intelligence, Data, Acquisitions, Supply Chain, and Sales Support. He led IBM’s efforts to transform into the premier cognitive enterprise by embedding Artificial Intelligence into internal business processes across the company. Prior to joining IBM's supply chain organization in 2011, Tim held several engineering roles leading the design, development and launch of several technologies and offerings for Lenovo and the former Personal Computer Division of IBM. Tim has over 20 years of global experience in the computing industry with experience in technical support, hardware and software development, quality assurance, and battery technology. He has earned numerous patents as well as management, innovation, and excellence awards for his contributions to the computing industry.

Active in the community, Tim engages in several non-profit fundraising activities, special events, and volunteer efforts and serves as a board member for many local non-profit organizations. Tim is also a very active mentor to over 30 global professionals, students, and youth.

Tim graduated from North Carolina State University in 1996 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering and is a North Carolina native and currently resides in Raleigh.



J. Stuart Hunter

J. Stuart Hunter

Inducted in 2015

J. Stuart Hunter (Stu) is a Professor Emeritus, School of Engineering and Applied Science at Princeton University. He has a BS, Electrical Engineering (1947); MS, Applied Mathematics (1949); and a PhD, Statistics (1954) all from North Carolina State University. He is the founding editor of the journal Technometrics (1958) and was President of the American Statistical Association (1992). He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Honorary Member of the American Society for Quality (1999) and elected member of the National Academy of Engineering in 2005.

Stu Hunter received the Shewhart Medal (1970) S.S. Wilks Medal: US Army (1987), the Deming Medal (1986), the Founders Award of the American Statistical Association (1994) and the W.J. Youden, Ellis Ott and Brunbaugh award of the American Society for Quality. He received a Doctor of Science, Honoris Causa, from NC State in 2006 and again in 2008 from Pennsylvania State University. He was published extensively and is the co-author of the text books Introductory Engineering Statistics and Statistics for Experimenters. He remains active as a consultant and lecturer.



Patrick Hutchins

Patrick Hutchins

Inducted in 2018

Mr. Patrick Hutchins, a native of Charlotte, North Carolina, received his Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from NC State University in 1985, and a Master’s in Business Administration from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington in 1992. He has spent his career creating excellence in the provision of life safety and mission critical products and has performed business in over 30 countries managing sales, service, business development and supply chain. Patrick began his career with Siemens in Wilmington, North Carolina where he had roles in Engineering and Quality in the production of electro-mechanical and solid-state circuit protection devices. He left Siemens to take part in a multi-factory relocation with Chloride Power Electronics, now a division of Emerson, where he held roles in Quality and Operations before taking over the reigns as General Manager and President of Chloride Power Electronics North American divisions.

Since his days at Chloride Power Electronics, Patrick has sought out roles in the production of high performance products, such as microwave transceivers and precision aerospace components. He has targeted companies that required leadership during significant growth or were in need of a turn-around expert. As a true believer of best practice and process, he also knows that people buy from people, and has consequently lived a career of customer engagement by offering irreplaceable value.

Currently, Patrick is the President of Staco Systems, a solutions provider of Human to Machine Interface products for aerospace and defense markets in Irvine, California. He also serves as a board member of Omni-Lite Industries and a consultant to the aerospace fastener industry.

Patrick has been a member of both the NC State Alumni Association and Wolfpack Club for over 30 years, resides in Orange County, California and has two grown children.



Craig Ivey

Craig Ivey

Inducted in 2016

Mr. Craig S. Ivey is president of Consolidated Edison Company of New York (Con Edison), a regulated utility with 14,000 employees serving New York City and most of Westchester County. The company is a subsidiary of Consolidated Edison, Inc., one of the nation’s largest investor-owned electric utilities, with approximately $13 billion in annual revenues and $36 billion in assets. Con Edison is a Dow Jones Sustainability Index company; its continuing emphasis on green initiatives to reduce carbon emissions have been recognized with commendations and awards from government agencies as well as nonprofit and private organizations, including the U.S. Department of Energy, the international Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP), and Innovest Strategic Value Investors.

Mr. Ivey and his team run electric operations across the entire service area; gas operations in Manhattan, the Bronx, and parts of Queens and Westchester; and steam operations in Manhattan. They are responsible for the safety, construction, planning, design, and reliability of an electric system that presently encompasses over 129,000 miles of underground and overhead electric cable, nearly 4,300 miles of gas mains, and 105 miles of steam mains, serving over nine million New Yorkers.

Mr. Ivey joined Con Edison in November 2009 after serving as a senior vice president in two different roles at Dominion Virginia Power since 2006, first as an SVP of Electric Delivery, then as an SVP of Transmission and Distribution. He had risen through a succession of increasingly responsible positions at Dominion, where he developed a reputation for emphasizing safety, operational excellence and leadership.

A native of Roanoke Rapids, N.C., Mr. Ivey originally joined Dominion in May 1985 after spending several summers during college working in the company’s Engineering and Planning Group. In 2003, three years after becoming vice president of Electric Operations, he played a key role in expeditiously managing service restoration of 1.8 million customers after the devastating Hurricane Isabel.

Mr. Ivey serves on the boards of nonprofit and industry organizations including the Hospital for Special Surgery, the Fresh Air Fund, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the New York State Smart Grid Consortium. Mr. Ivey earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from North Carolina State University in 1985, and has completed executive education programs at the University of Michigan and Harvard University. In 2005, he received the Black Engineer of the Year Award for Career Achievement in Industry.



Patti Key

Patti Key

Inducted in 2018

Patti Key joined Keysight Technologies via acquisition in 2017 and leads global sales for the Ixia Solutions Group. Prior to Keysight, Patti held leadership positions at companies including Ixia, Agilent Technologies, Hewlett-Packard, and BellSouth. She joined Ixia in 2008 as a Vice President and led sales in the East Region and then the Americas. She was promoted in 2016 to Senior Vice President for Global Sales and was instrumental in positioning the company for the 1.6 billion dollar acquisition.

She held a variety of engineering and leadership roles at Agilent, HP and BellSouth and during that time, she became a licensed professional engineer and was awarded two patents. Patti also currently serves as a Technical Advisory Board member for Uplevel Systems.

Patti holds a BS in Electrical Engineering from North Carolina State University. She is Co-Founder of CC’s Heart Fund, a non-profit that helps provide financial assistance to families for pets that need life-extending cardiac care.



Raymond Leopold

Raymond Leopold

Inducted in 2018

Dr. Raymond J. Leopold was the chief technologist and co-inventor of The Iridium System, the first realization of worldwide, wireless, personal communications. As the Vice President and Chief Technical Officer of Motorola’s Satellite Communications Group he guided the creation, development, deployment, and initial operation of Iridium. He is an IEEE Life Fellow, an Aviation Week and Space Technology Laureate for Space and an inductee in their Hall of Fame at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. He is a recipient of The IEEE Third Millennium Medal, The AIAA Biennial Communications Award, and The Mobile Satellite Users' Association’s Pioneer Award. He is also a Motorola Master Innovator and holds Motorola’s highest technical honor, The Title of Dan Noble Fellow. He has 27 US Patents and 75 foreign patents.

A retired Air Force Lieutenant Colonel, he directed the development of military communications systems, twice served in The Pentagon, taught at the USAF Academy, performed R&D at the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and earned The Defense Meritorious Service Medal, The Air Force Meritorious Service Medal with two oak leaf clusters, The Air Force Commendation Medal, and The National Defense Medal.

He was the James C. Hunsaker Visiting Professor of Aerospace Systems at MIT’s Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and delivered their Golden Anniversary Minta Martin Lecture in 2004. He previously chaired MIT’s Industry Advisory Board for their Conceive-Design-Implement-Operate Initiative. He earned his BS in Electrical Engineering from the USAF Academy in 1967, a Master’s of Electrical Engineering from NC State in 1968, and his PhD from the University of New Mexico in 1973, and was honored with a Doctorate in Telecommunications Management from South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in 1997.



Michael A. Littlejohn

Michael A. Littlejohn

Inducted in 2015

Michael A. Littlejohn earned a BS and MS in Electrical Engineering (1962 and 1964), and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in 1967, all from NC State University. He was a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at NC State from 1967-2002, and implemented and directed the 2 + 2 Engineering Program at UNC Asheville. He has authored over 150 papers in refereed scientific and technical journals. Littlejohn was elected as a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He is one of the principal founders of the Solid State Electronics Laboratory at NC State University and provided significant leadership in the founding of the Microelectronics Center of North Carolina.

Littlejohn has received the Sigma Xi Outstanding Young Scientist Award, the Alcoa Foundation Distinguished Research Award, the Alexander Quarles Holladay Medal for Excellence for teaching and research, and the Certificate of Appreciation for Patriotic Civilian Service from the Department of the Army. He was elected to the Academy of Outstanding Teachers and named an Alumni Distinguished Professor and recognized for excellence by the Western Electric American Society of Engineering Fund. He is the principle author and investigator for proposal funded by the National Science Foundation in the amount of $30 million for development of the Southeastern University of College Coalition for Engineering Education. He was the first director for this project and helped pioneer innovative teaching methods, new curriculum concepts and multidisciplinary programs for engineering education, the development for methods in distance education, and the development of new techniques in educational technology.



Paul L. Madren, Jr.

Paul L. Madren, Jr.

Inducted in 2017

Mr. Paul L. Madren Jr., earned a certificate in Electrical Technology from Morehead City Technical Institute, served in the U.S. Air Force and served in Korea (1952-53), and attended N.C. State in 1955-59, earning a B.S. in Electrical Engineering. Mr. Madren’s senior project was a specialized circuit and he said, “That’s the last time I worked with vacuum tubes.” Within a year, he was designing transistor circuits for Bendix Radio while Bendix built its first transistor manufacturing plant, and Mr. Madren received a patent for a 100 MHz analog-to-digital converter.

At Raytheon, he designed timing mechanisms (an essential part of the first EKG) and worked on converting analog and digital TV signals. The latter work enabled live broadcasts of the NASA astronauts’ moon landings, and underpinned the 1990s’ conversion of analog TV broadcasting to digital.

At IBM, between 1963 and 1990, Mr. Madren designed interfaces that connected office typewriters with other business machines, worked on interfaces for high-speed data telecom circuits, helped develop an early voice-recognition system for numbers (it led to the 411 system), and met Bill Gates and Steve Jobs while evaluating operating systems for the original 1981 IBM PC. While employed by IBM, he was liaison to the FCC and U.S. State Department on national and international telecom standards and sometimes chaired industry standards groups for TIA, EIA and CCITT.

He has kept bees as a hobby since 1960 and is one of only 12 N.C. State Master Craftsman Beekeepers.



Robin E. Manning

Robin E. Manning

Inducted in 2015

Rob Manning is the vice president of transmission for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Power Delivery and Utilization research sector. In this role Manning has overall management and technical responsibility for the annual research activities conducted by EPRI’s transmission programs in collaboration with its global membership.

Following graduation from NC State, Manning joined Duke Energy in 1978 and served as process owner for energy delivery, vice president of electrical standards, vice president of electric transmission and distribution, vice president of gas pipeline engineering, and vice president of operations for the Carolinas before leaving for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 2008. Manning served as the executive vice president of Power Delivery and chief external relations officer for TVA.

Manning has chaired or served on the board of a number of industry organizations. He currently leads One Heart Global Ministries, an Ecuadorian based ministry organization. He formerly served on the University of Houston Engineering Leadership Board, and serves as the current president of the North Carolina State Engineering Foundation Board.

Manning earned a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering from North Carolina State University and a Master of Business Administration from Queens College in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Remember acquiring knowledge is the beginning of success. True success is the summation of life experiences grounded in knowledge and developed by listening and respecting the contributions of others. It is not how you acquire knowledge, but how you share it that counts.



Stephen H. Marbut

Stephen H. Marbut

Inducted in 2015

Steve Marbut received a BS in Electrical Engineering from NC State University in 1974. Starting with an interview through the NC State placement office, Marbut began his career with General Electric Company. He progressed through various assignments in technical sales and marketing, product management, purchasing and logistics to President of Hitachi GE lighting in Toyko. He was responsible for multiple new product introductions, achieved over thirty five million dollars in purchasing cost reductions, restructured logistics operations in both the US and Europe and expanded the Hitachi GE lighting business fivefold in revenue.

Moving to President and CEO of Lummus Corporation, Marbut addressed a needed turnaround delivering earnings consistently in the range of 15% of revenue. He tripled sales, grew global share to over 50% and implemented “design for manufacturability” and lean “demand flow” initiatives that drove manufacturing cycle times down from months to days. Greenfield operations were established in China and India and three major acquisitions completed. Lummus has introduced more than twenty five new products during his tenure and has nine active patents. Marbut’s volunteer work includes Chairman of the Board and Trustee for Hilton Head Island Preparatory School, President and Board member of Hilton Head Baseball Association, past member of Georgia Southern University Business School advisory board and past member of the Savannah Chamber of Commerce.



Robert J. Mattauch

Robert J. Mattauch

Inducted in 2017

Robert Mattauch earned M.S. and Ph.D degrees in Electrical Engineering from North Carolina State University in 1964 and 1967. He joined the EE faculty of UVa in 1996 where he taught many undergraduate courses, initiated semiconductor device research in the Commonwealth and founded the UVa Semiconductor Device Lab. Mattauch and his team collaborated with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab on millimeter wave device designed and fabrication for detection of chlorine monoxide, responsible for the disassociation of stratospheric ozone molecules (ozone hole).

In 1996 he moved to the Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, VA where he served as founding Chair of the Electrical and Computer Engineering department. Subsequently, he served as Dean of the School from 1999 until his retirement in 2007. During this time, he was responsible for building and funding 2 buildings with over 250,000 sq. ft. of teaching and research space, achieving the School’s first ABET accreditation with a level of 6 V (highest possible) for all eligible departments, established the School’s graduate / research program, and began both Eta Kappa Nu and Tau Beta Pi chapters.

Dr. Mattauch’s love of teaching and research is indicated by his receiving the Western Electric Fund Award of the ASEE for excellence in teaching engineering students, the T. Holmes MacDonald Award of Eta Kappa Nu as an Outstanding EE Educator in 1975, being listing in Washington Technology as one of the Top Ten Technology Talents of 1990, being elected to the level of Fellow of the IEEE in 1987, receiving an IEEE Centennial Medal, and being honored by the IEEE Transactions on Terahertz Science and Technology as one of its 23 Terahertz Pioneers.



John S. Mayo

John S. Mayo

Inducted in 2015    Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award in 1977

The distinguished career of this outstanding alumnus is marked with significant contributions to the development of electronics. He joined Bell Laboratories in 1955, where he worked on early computers, including the TRADIC and Leprechaun, the Telstar satellite, ocean sonar systems, and various switching systems. he held several key positions and became Vice President of Electronics Technology in 1975 before becoming the company's seventh president in 1991. Credited with globalizing Bell Labs and forging closer ties between its research and development and its business units, he served in that role until his retirement in 1995.

He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from North Carolina State in 1952, 1953, and 1955, respectively.

Notable among his career achievements are his work on the command decoder and switching unit for the Telstar Communications Satellite and his involvement in developing methods for transmitting picturephone signals. As the executive of the Ocean Systems Division during 1971-1973, he directed the development of electronic systems for use in the ocean. As Executive Director of the Toll Electronic Switching Division during 1973-75, he was responsible for the first electronic system to switch long distance telephone calls. Among his current responsibilities is that of directing the design and development of efficient, low-cost, high-reliability electronics components and associated technologies for use in the telecommunications industry. He holds 12 patents and is the author of numerous technical papers.



Thomas R. McPherson, Jr.

Thomas R. McPherson, Jr.

Inducted in 2015    Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award in 2004

Thomas R. McPherson Jr. is a successful entrepreneur who founded and led several successful high-tech companies. These efforts resulted in one IPO and two mergers. He held executive positions at Hughes Network Systems, Bay Networks and Nortel. Tom currently serves on several boards while pursuing his interest in golf, aviation and international travel.

McPherson played a leadership role in successfully establishing companies such as Picture Element Limited, Network Equipment Technologies, Rapid City Communications, Hatteras Networks, Inc., and most recently as CEO of Cognio, Inc., which was sold to Cisco.

McPherson is a 2004 Distinguished Engineering Alumnus and served as the first chairman of the Engineering Entrepreneurs Program Advisory Committee. He has also delivered NC State’s Entrepreneurs’ Lecture. He established the McPherson Family Distinguished Professorship in support of Engineering Entrepreneurship.

In addition to earning his BS EE and MS EE from the NC State College of Engineering, he received his BS in physics from Davidson College and his Engineer’s Degree from George Washington University.

McPherson resides in North Carolina with his wife Kathy where they enjoy a view of the renown Pinehurst No. 2. He is Chairman of the Given Tufts in Pinehurst and serves on the NC State Engineering Foundation as immediate past President.



Darrell V. Menscer

Darrell V. Menscer

Inducted in 2015    Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award in 1997

A dedicated NC State alumnus, this outstanding 1960 electrical engineering graduate of NC State retired as President and Chief Operating Officer of PSI Energy in 1990. After distinguished service in the US Air Force from 1952 to 1956, he began his career with Carolina Power and Light Company in 1960. In 1980 he left his post as Senior Vice President of Power Supply at CP&L to work with PSI Energy Inc. in Plainfield, IN, as president and chief operating officer and to serve as a member of the board of directors of PSI Resources Inc.

He was appointed a member of the Electric Power Research Institute’s Research Advisory Committee, the major policy-setting body for electric power engineering research and development in the US.

A leader of volunteerism at NC State, he has served as chair of the NC State Foundation Board, NC Engineering Foundation Board, the College of Engineering Advisory Board, the Century II Campaign Committee and the Executive Committee of the NC State Development Board. An avid Wolfpack fan, he is a member of the Wolfpack Club and participates in the Alumni Adopt-A-Scholar Program. He is a Caldwell Scholarship benefactor and a member of the Leonidas Polk Lifetime Giving Society and the Chancellor’s Circle. Menscer was the recipient of the Menscer Cup in 1997, the NC State College of Engineering Distinguished Alumnus award in 1997, and the NC State Watauga Medal in 2001.



Tony L. Mitchell

Tony L. Mitchell

Inducted in 2015

Tony L. Mitchell earned the Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering in 1987 on a USAF graduate fellowship. He is the first full-time African American to earn that degree from NC State. His dissertation won him the 1988 USAF Research & Development Award.

Dr. Mitchell has over 45 years of professional success, including 31 years university service. His talents earned USAF promotion to Lieutenant Colonel, university promotion to Assistant Dean of Engineering, the 2000 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring, and grants of over $35,000,000.

Prior to selection to the ECE Hall of Fame, perhaps the most appropriate tribute to Dr. Mitchell’s outstanding career occurred when he was featured in 55,000 copies of the Fall 2011 NC State Engineering Magazine.

Dr. Mitchell retired from NC State in 2011 and assumed the title of Assistant Dean of Engineering, Emeritus. He continues to serve locally as chair of the NC State Lifelong Faculty Involvement Standing Committee, board member of the Association of Retired Faculty, and member of the NC Martin Luther King, Jr. Commission. National service include scholarship chair of the General H. Hugh Shelton National Leadership Center, ABET program evaluator and consultant to the National Science Foundation.

I grew up in Robeson County, then and likely still the poorest in NC. I never imagined being blessed with such a fulfilling career and life. Never stop dreaming but realize dreams are accomplished through perseverance, patience, self-confidence, some luck and most of all, faith. Things DO happen for a reason!



Tony Montalvo

Tony Montalvo

Inducted in 2018

Tony Montalvo received a B.S. in Physics from Loyola University New Orleans in 1985 and an M.S.E.E. from Columbia University in 1987. He was with Advanced Micro Devices from 1987 to 1991 where he was involved in the first generation of Flash memories and is a co-inventor of several fundamental patents.
He arrived at NC State in 1991 and received his Ph.D. in 1995. His Ph.D. involved an analog implementation of a neural network machine learning system. While in grad school, he taught a junior level circuits class and received the Best Teacher award. After completing his Ph.D. he joined Ericsson in Research Triangle Park where he developed RF integrated circuits for cellular handsets.
Tony has been with Analog Devices since 2000 when he founded their Raleigh design center on Centennial Campus. At ADI he has led the development of a family of software defined radio products with a wide range of applications ranging from cellular base stations to satellite communications. He was promoted to Fellow in 2012 and in 2017 became the Director of Technology of the more than $1 Billion Communications Business Unit.
He taught an RF integrated circuits course at NC State as an Adjunct Professor between 1998 and 2004. In addition, he served on the technical program committee of the International Solid State Circuits Conference for 8 years. He has over 30 patents and 15 conference or journal papers.
Tony has four children and lives in Raleigh with his wife Linda Zier and their two youngest kids.



Larry K. Monteith

Larry K. Monteith

Inducted in 2015    Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award in 1999

After four years as an aviation electronics technician in the United States Navy, Larry K. Monteith enrolled in North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering in 1956 and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering in 1960. After graduation, he was employed by Bell Telephone Laboratory and gained limited experience from productions of military ground to air missiles and the Telstar communication satellite while enrolled at Duke University and graduating with a Master of Science degree in 1962. Monteith then worked for the developing Solid-state Micro-electronics division of the Research Triangle Institute and established programs supported by NASA before graduating from Duke with a PhD in 1965. He then joined the faculty at the renowned North Carolina State University at Raleigh in 1968 as an associate professor in the Solid State Micro-electronics division of the Department of Electrical Engineering.

Monteith was active in developing research, graduate program, teaching and extension programs when appointed in 1974 as head of the department and then in 1978 as the dean of engineering. After a decade as a dean, Monteith accepted the position of interim and then chancellor in 1988 and 1989 before retiring in 1998 after thirty years of service when the efforts of faculty throughout the entire university improved undergraduate, graduate, research and centennial campus programs that resulted in substantial growth and prominence for the institution.

From my experience, successes seem to be personal achievements from your innovations and motivations with education from others where required.



Robert Moorhead, II

Robert Moorhead, II

Inducted in 2018

Robert J Moorhead II is the Billie J. Ball Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Mississippi State University and the director of two research institutes at MSU: The Geosystems Research Institute and The Northern Gulf Institute, a NOAA Cooperative Institute. Dr. Moorhead is on the Board of Directors of the IEEE Computer Society’s Technical Committee on Visualization and Graphics, having served as Chair, Vice-Chair for Conferences, and Conference Chair over the past 20 years. He received the Career Achievement Award and the Outstanding Engineering Research Award from the Mississippi State University Bagley College of Engineering. He has been an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics. He has led analytical visualization research and development efforts in support of a plethora of engineering and science studies: computational fluid dynamics, physical oceanography, meteorology, disposal of dredged materials, and coastal / severe storms. Over the years, his research has migrated from image processing to visualization of large-scale computer simulations to most recently using unmanned aerial systems for advancing agriculture performance and understanding the environment.

Dr. Moorhead received a BS in Electrical Engineering from Geneva College in 1980 and a MS in Electrical Engineering from North Carolina State University in 1982. After receiving his Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering in 1985 from NC State under Dr. Sarah Rajala, he joined the Image Technologies Group at IBM’s Research Center in New York as a Research Staff Member where he worked on what became the JPEG image standard. He joined Mississippi State University in 1989. Robert is married to Jane Nicholson Moorhead, a 1982 NC State University graduate in Electrical Engineering and a fellow faculty member at Mississippi State University.



Andrew Mueller

Andrew Mueller

Inducted in 2018

Dr. Andrew Mueller received his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from NC State in 1992. While at NC State, Dr. Mueller worked as a cooperative engineering student at the NASA Johnson Space Center where he completed assignments as a flight controller in Mission Control and a systems engineer in the Astronaut Office. He also founded a start-up program in which undergraduate students designed and built a space shuttle payload for NASA. The Orbital Debris Radar Calibration Spheres Project flew successfully on the Orbiter Discovery in February of 1993.

Dr. Mueller earned his Doctor of Medicine from the University of North Carolina in 1996. He completed his training in Family Medicine at Malcolm-Grow Medical Center, Andrews Air Force Base, where he was selected as Chief Resident in 1998. After completing his residency, he was assigned to Charleston Air Force Base where he served as a flight surgeon. His duties included serving as a crew member aboard USAF C-17 Globemaster III and deploying overseas in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

Dr. Mueller joined Novant Health as a family physician in 2006. He has accepted increasing responsibilities in various physician leadership roles. He currently serves as a Senior Vice President of Novant Health and the President of the Greater Charlotte Market for Novant Health. In this capacity, he is responsible for the profit and loss statement, strategy, growth, implementation of value-based care arrangements, patient experience, market service lines, community relations and capital and operating budgets for the entire market. He also oversees the Community Medicine, Pediatrics, Behavioral Health and Orthopedics service lines across the entire health system. He continues to practice medicine as a family physician.

Dr. Mueller is a Wolfpack enthusiast. His grandfather, father, and wife attended NC State, and his oldest daughter is a current Park Scholar who will graduate in 2019.



Sharat Nagaraj

Sharat Nagaraj

Inducted in 2015

Sharat Nagaraj is currently the President/CEO of Celito Communications, Cnc. a Raleigh-born, Raleigh-grown company that was started while he was a student at NC State University. Sharat launched Celito in July 1999 with a passion for providing “desktop to the Internet” solutions for business. A Raleigh, N.C., resident since 1985 and graduate of North Carolina State University (BS in Computer Engineering, 1999), Sharat’s interest in computer engineering began as a student at Enloe High School. While at N.C. State, he worked in a co-op program for Cisco Systems and started his first business, Onsite Computer Services.

Nagaraj has taught numerous network security classes, utilizing Cisco hardware devices, to large corporate and governmental organizations. He has planned and implemented security systems in organizations throughout Wake County and consulted on large corporate projects around the country. With an innate entrepreneurial spirit, Nagaraj thrives on assisting and fostering new businesses. An active member of the business community and supporter of the arts and children’s charities, he is the immediate past Board Chair at Marbles Kids Museum and a current Board of Trustee at The North Carolina Symphony.

As you go through college and life, enjoy and cherish every moment, good or bad as you go through it…..because success is very relative and personal.



Sanjay Nayak

Sanjay Nayak

Inducted in 2015

Sanjay Nayak is a successful entrepreneur and a well-regarded thought leader in Indian telecom and electronics industry for his views on innovation, entrepreneurship and technology. Nayak co-founded Tejas Networks in Bangalore, as India’s pioneering telecom equipment company. He inculcated a culture of innovation and excellence in Tejas, which has become a market leader in India and is ranked amongst the top-10 global optical networking vendors in its segment. Over the last 10 years, Tejas has cumulatively generated revenues of over US$ 500 Million, has customers in more than 60 countries and employs over 600 people. Prior to founding Tejas Networks, Nayak was Managing Director of Synopsys (India), a global leader in Electronic Design Automation software. Earlier in his career, Nayak served as Director-R&D in Cadence Design Systems and contributed to the development of industry-leading VHDL simulator. He also played a key role working with government and industry to help frame India’s new electronics policies.

Nayak has received several awards including the “Electronics Man of the Year” and “Technovation Sarabhai Award” from Indian Electronics & Semiconductor Association. He did his BS from Birla Institute of Technology Mesra (India), where he was the Gold Medalist of his graduating class.

Always stay positive, believe in yourself and be persistent. There may be nine valid reasons why something cannot be done but you have to find that one reason that matters and get it done!



Shree K. Nayar

Shree K. Nayar

Inducted in 2016

Dr. Shree K. Nayar is the T. C. Chang Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University. He heads the Columbia Vision Laboratory (CAVE), which develops advanced computer vision systems. His research is focused on three areas – the creation of novel cameras that provide new forms of visual information, the design of physics based models for vision and graphics, and the development of algorithms for understanding scenes from images. Dr. Nayar’s work is motivated by applications in the fields of digital imaging, computer graphics, robotics and human-computer interfaces.

Dr. Nayar received a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from Birla Institute of Technology, an Master of Science degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from North Carolina State University, and a PhD degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. For his research and teaching he has received several honors including the David Marr Prize (1990 and 1995), the David and Lucile Packard Fellowship (1992), the National Young Investigator Award (1993), the NTT Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award (1994), the Keck Foundation Award for Excellence in Teaching (1995), the Columbia Great Teacher Award (2006), and the Carnegie Mellon Alumni Achievement Award (2009). For his contributions to computer vision and computational imaging, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2008, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2011, and the National Academy of Inventors in 2014.



Larry Nixon

Larry Nixon

Inducted in 2015

In 1969, Larry Nixon was a founder of the engineering firm of BASS, NIXON & KENNEDY, Inc. from which he has retired as President. While serving as Chair of the NC Board of Engineering Examiners he was appointed as the NCEES member of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. After completing his service to NCEES, he served as NSPE Southern Vice-President and was appointed to the ABET Engineering Accreditation Commission to represent NSPE where he served as Vice-Chair. He is a senior member of IEEE and served as a Program Evaluator for IEEE and ABET for accrediting engineering programs throughout the country. Representing NSPE, he was appointed to the ABET Board of Directors where he served on the Executive Committee and as national President of ABET in 2002. He has served as President of PENC and was designated as NC Engineer of the Year for 1991. He has received both the NCEES Distinguished Service Award and the NSPE Distinguished Service Award and is a charter Fellow of NSPE and PENC and in 2005, a Fellow of ABET.

Nixon has served NC State University as a member of the Athletics Council, a member of the NC State Alumni Association Board of Directors, as President of the Engineering Foundation, as President of the Wolfpack Club and Chair of the Building Committee for the Wolfpack Club for the recently completed $128 million dollar expansion of athletic facilities. He is a member of the Riddick Lifetime Giving Societies and the Dean’s Circle.

Summer intern work may become the best advancement of your engineering career and your best job interview. Seek out a good summer job. Both my daughter (BSEE ’85) and I subsequently worked for our intern employer after graduation.



William Nussey

William Nussey

Inducted in 2016

Mr. William C. Nussey started his first software company while in high school. As co-founder, he helped develop enhanced graphics software for one of the earliest microcomputers. He co-founded his second company, Da Vinci Systems, from his dorm room in North Carolina State University. As CEO, he grew the company to become one of the most widely used applications in the world. When he sold the company in 1994, Da Vinci Systems had more than 3 million users in 45 countries.

Mr. Nussey later joined Greylock, a venture capital firm based out of Boston and Silicon Valley. He spent several years investing in early Internet companies and ultimately left to run one of the firm’s largest investments—Internet consulting firm iXL. As CEO, Mr. Nussey helped lead iXL through several years of 250 percent annual growth, a successful IPO and, ultimately achieving annualized revenues close to $500 million. While at iXL, Mr. Nussey was named the most influential consultant in the world by Consulting Magazine.

After iXL, Mr. Nussey became CEO of Silverpop, a leading cloud-based digital marketing company. When Silverpop was acquired by IBM in 2014, it had 500 employees, nearly $100 million in revenue and served 5,000 organizations across 42 countries. In 2015, Mr. Nussey was promoted to VP Corporate Strategy to work with IBM’s CEO and top executives in setting the company’s overall direction. In 2016, Mr. Nussey left IBM to pursue his decade-long passion for the distributed, renewable energy industry. His first project, a book, is due out in late 2017.

Mr. Nussey has served on the board of numerous technology companies and nonprofits. He is the author of several publications, including The Quiet Revolution in Email Marketing and has received several patents. Mr. Nussey received a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering from North Carolina State University in 1987 and an MBA from Harvard Business School.

If you want to make the biggest possible difference in the world, surround yourself with the best people you can find. There is no level of individual talent that can beat a well-orchestrated team and there is no triumph that is more rewarding than one that is shared.



Billy B. Oliver

Billy B. Oliver

Inducted in 2015

Billy B. Oliver is a Communications Consultant who recently retired from AT&T Communications after working with AT&T for almost forty years.

He was born in Selma, N.C. in 1925. He graduated from Selma High School in 1942, served in the U.S. Navy in World War II, and graduated with honors from North Carolina State College in 1954 with a degree in Electrical Engineering. While at N .C. State he was President of Campus Government, received the “Outstanding Engineering Senior” award, was a member of Golden Chain, Blue Key, Phi Kappa Phi, Thu Beta Pi, Eta Kappa Nu, Thete Thu, and IEEE. He also worked at radio station WRAL to support his family while attending school.

During his forty years with AT&T he held various assignments in Engineering, Plant, and Sales, and attended a two year training program at Bell Telephone Laboratories. His last two positions were that of Chief Engineer of nine southeastern states from 1967 to 1972, and Vice President Engineering Planning & Design at AT&T Long Lines Headquarters from 1972 until his retirement in 1985. While in his last position, he was accountable for planning, designing, and directing the evolution of AT&T’s long distance network. He was responsible for network architectures, technical policies and standards, new technologies and network capabilities, and maintenance and provisioning support systems. It was during this period that AT&T’s network was converted to Common Channel Signaling, the switching machines were replaced with 4ESS digital switches, the first fiber optic cables were installed, and the network was being converted to Dynamic Nonhierarchical Routing.

While with AT&T Mr. Oliver served on the National Academy of Science panels for the Space Application Board and the Social Security Mechanization Board. He prepared testimony and testified before the Federal Communications Commission, Senator Hollis committee of the U.S. Senate, and before Judge Greene on the AT&T anti-trust case. Mr. Oliver holds three patents. He serves on the Board of Directors of Digital Microwave Corp. and Communications Network Enhancements Inc.

Billy Oliver and his wife Irma reside in New Jersey. The Olivers have two children; a daughter Mrs. Jenny 0. Briney of Virginia and a son David Oliver of New York. Mr. Oliver is a member of the United Methodist Church in Chatham, N J .His hobbies are fishing, swimming, golf, and bridge.

Mr. Oliver is co-recipient of the 1989 IEEE Alexander Graham Bell Medal, along with Gerald R. Ash, “For contributions to the conceptions and implementation of Dynamic Nonhierarchical Routing (DNHR) in telecommunications networks.”



Dan Page

Dan Page

Inducted in 2017

Dan Page earned a BSEE from NC State University in1985 while working at General Electric’s Microelectronics Center in Research Triangle Park. Upon graduating, Mr. Page joined Advanced Micro Devices in Austin, Texas where he transitioned from chip design to the development and support of design automation software.

In 1987 he returned to North Carolina to join four of his GE colleagues at Integrated Silicon Systems as one of the first employees at the RTP-based startup that specialized in developing electronic design automation (EDA) applications for the semiconductor market. ISS was one of the early EDA startups in RTP and was one of the first investments of Durham-based venture capitalist firm Intersouth Partners. Mr. Page was responsible for product development and was the Vice President of Engineering when ISS went public in 1994. He has continued with the company through various acquisitions and today serves as a Vice President of Research and Development in the Design Group at Synopsys, Inc., a $2.6 billion global software company with more than 11,000 employees

During the past 30 years Mr. Page has held numerous roles, focusing primarily on software used for physical and electrical validation of chip designs, a critical component of the semiconductor industry’s ability to deliver advanced designs containing billions of nanometer scale transistors. Outside of Synopsys, he serves as an industry representative on the US Commerce Department’s Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee and is an avid pilot and cyclist.



Alice C. Parker

Alice C. Parker

Inducted in 2017

Dr. Alice Cline Parker, an alumna of NC State, obtained both a BSEE in 1970 and a Ph.D. in 1975. She has been a professor since then, serving first in EE at Carnegie Mellon University for 5 years then in EE at the University of Southern California for the past 37 years. She is a Fellow of the IEEE, a teaching award winner in the Viterbi School of Engineering, and a service-award winner given by the South Central Scholars for her volunteer work guiding underrepresented students.

Dr. Parker has been an active researcher first in design automation and presently in neuromorphic circuits. She is one of the founders of the High-Level (Behavioral) Synthesis Field. She is the author of over 180 peer-reviewed publications, and has graduated over 30 Ph.D. students. She has received funding from the Army Research Office, DARPA, NSF, several DoD organizations, IBM, and SRC and has been a consultant to many organizations.

Her more recent accomplishments include the first synapse (part of an electronic neuron) constructed with carbon nanotube transistors, the first analog circuit designs of astrocytes (a cell found in the brain) interacting with circuits modeling neurons, noisy and chaotic analog neural circuits, and a neural network that teaches itself Sudoku-like games with only reward signals to neurons that provide correct guesses.

She attributes her success to her father’s mentoring and early mentoring by Prof. Wayland P. Seagraves in the NC State EE Department.



Nelson Peeler

Nelson Peeler

Inducted in 2017

Mr. Nelson Peeler is the senior vice president and chief transmission officer for Duke Energy. In this role, he has overall responsibility for planning, design, construction, maintenance and operations of Duke Energy’s electric transmission system, which includes over 32,000 miles of high-voltage power lines and more than 3,000 substations in six states.

Following graduation from NC State in 1988, he joined Duke Energy and has held a variety of leadership positions in power delivery, system planning and operations, performance support, engineering, construction, business planning, contract management, process improvement and training. Prior to assuming his current position, Mr. Peeler served as vice president of transmission system planning and operations, where he had responsibility for real-time monitoring and control of the company’s bulk electric transmission system.

The Faith, N.C., native graduated from North Carolina State University with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and earned an MBA from Queens University. He is a registered professional engineer in North Carolina and South Carolina.

Mr. Peeler has chaired or served on the boards of a number of industry organizations. He currently serves on the boards of directors of the North American Energy Standards Board, SERC Reliability Corporation, Florida Reliability Coordinating Council and the North American Transmission Forum, where he is a past chair. Additionally, he is a member of the board of directors for the North Carolina State Engineering Foundation and has served as chair of the strategic advisory committee of the Electrical and Computer Engineering department.



John L. Prince

John L. Prince

Inducted in 2015

John L. Prince graduated from Southern Methodist University with high honors and attended graduate school at NCSU with an NSF Fellowship where he honed his skills as a research engineer at Research Triangle Institute.

Believing that industry experience was important, Prince began his career at Texas Instruments, Inc., before moving to Clemson University where he continued semiconductor research and achieved the rank of Professor. Later, he was Director of Reliability Assurance for Intermedics, Inc., and learned much about the medical device industry.

Returning to academia as Professor in the ECE department at University of Arizona in 1983, Prince directed research centers focused primarily on electronic packaging and taught microelectronics courses. He had great respect for students who wanted to learn and did all he could to encourage them. On sabbatical he served as Distinguished Visiting Scientist and Acting Director of Packaging Sciences for Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC).

Prince was awarded the rank of IEEE Fellow in 1990, SRC Inventor Award in 1988, the 1988 Semiconductor International Technology Achievement Award, and Arizona Innovator of the Year in 1991. Through the years he served on scientific advisory committees to the Department of Defense.

A plaque presented at the 2006 IEEE 10th Workshop on Signal Propagation on Interconnects in Berlin, Germany, states:
“Remembering John L. Prince
Provocative yet Calm, Curious yet Courteous,
Visionary yet Pragmatist, Challenging yet Friendly
This was the legacy of John!
A dear colleague and friend, whose
activities and vision had a profound impact on our
engineering community”



Deborah S. Proctor

Deborah S. Proctor

Inducted in 2015

Deborah S. Proctor, General Manager and Chief Engineer of WCPE, passed the exam for a FCC “First Class Radio License” while too young to get a driver’s license. As an Electrical Engineering student at NC State University in the early 1970s, she and four of her peers founded WCPE, which is an independent listener-supported radio station dedicated to excellence in classical music broadcasting. They handbuilt a 12,500 watt transmitter and all of the studio equipment and made a L-Band microwave Tx/Rx pair to connect the transmitter to the studio five miles away. On July 17, 1978, WCPE’s first program, the BBC World News, was broadcast via shortwave. This also marked the first regular US rebroadcast of their news. Among the innovations that Ms. Proctor has overseen at WCPE is the creation of an international Internet broadcast presence, making WCPE the first radio to be broadcast over the Internet (October 2, 1996).

Through the 1990s, she worked to upgrade the FM rules for public radio to those of commercial radio, correcting a 100 fold technical anomaly between them, now nicknamed “The Raleigh Rule.” Ms. Proctor also helped pass a November 2002 Federal law giving small, non-profit webcasters a simple royalty license. Ms. Proctor is a Certified Professional Broadcast Engineering, an IEEE member, a founding member of the NC Public Radio Association, and has served on the NC Public Broadcasting Advisory Board and the NC Association of Broadcasters Board. For more than 30 years, she has combined her knowledge of engineering with her love of classical music, creating great prominence for the station.



Hairong Qi

Hairong Qi

Inducted in 2017

Hairong Qi received the Ph.D. degree in computer engineering from North Carolina State University, Raleigh, in 1999. She studied under Dr. Wesley E. Snyder while at NC State. She is currently the Gonzalez Family Professor with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Her research interests are in advanced imaging and collaborative processing, hyperspectral image analysis, computer vision and machine learning. Dr. Qi's research is supported by the National Science Foundation, DARPA, IARPA, Office of Naval Research, NASA, Department of Homeland Security, etc.

Dr. Qi is the recipient of the NSF CAREER Award. She also received the Best Paper Awards at the 18th International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR’06), the 3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Distributed Smart Cameras (ICDSC’09), and IEEE Workshop on Hyperspectral Image and Signal Processing: Evolution in Remote Sensor (WHISPERS’15). She is awarded the Highest Impact Paper from the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society in 2012. Dr. Qi has published over 200 technical papers in archival journals and refereed conference proceedings, including two co-authored books with Dr. Wesley Snyder in Computer Vision. She has graduated 18 PhD and 23 MS students since 1999.



Jason P. Rhode

Jason P. Rhode

Inducted in 2015

Jason Rhode, Ph.D., was named president and chief executive officer in May 2007. Previously, Dr. Rhode served as vice president and general manager of Cirrus Logic’s Mixed Signal Audio Division, where he oversaw the revitalization of Cirrus Logic’s strong portfolio of analog and mixed-signal converter ICs for consumer and professional audio markets. Previously, Rhode served as director of marketing for analog and mixed signal products.

Rhode joined Cirrus Logic upon completion of his doctorate degree in 1995 from North Carolina State University, serving as an analog design engineer. Rhode assumed roles as design manager in 1998 and became director of Marketing in 2002.

A member of IEEE, Jason has been issued 19 U.S. patents in the area of mixed signal technologies.

Rhode holds a bachelor of science in electrical engineering from San Diego State University, as well as a masters of science in electrical engineering and a doctorate from North Carolina State University.



James R. Schofield

James R. Schofield

Inducted in 2017

Mr. James “Jim” Schofield, a Navy veteran, received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Electrical Engineering ‘59, with honors, from North Carolina State College. He was an integral part of Douglas Aircraft, McDonnell Douglas, and Boeing until his retirement as Program Manager of Payload Processing Operations at Kennedy Space Center in May of 2001.

Mr. Schofield’s unmanned experience encompasses the development of NIKE Ajax, Hercules, and Zeus missile defense systems. He was a major contributor to the DELTA Program presently in use providing communication, weather, GPS, and defense satellites in space. He was the NIKE Zeus Launch Director on June 5, 1963 when President John F. Kennedy was the first sitting President to witness an unmanned launch at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico.

Mr. Schofield also had key roles in launching 122 manned space missions. He was the SV-Third Stage Launch Director for all 9 Apollo moon missions and while serving in this position on November 14, 1969, Richard M. Nixon--the first sitting president to attend a manned launch-- was in the viewing area as Apollo 12 was launched. Mr. Schofield’s Space Shuttle payload processing ingenuity enabled multiple satellites, experiments, interplanetary probes, and complex technical equipment to achieve their objectives in space.

He received a combined 14 NASA Honors, Recognitions, Commendations, and a United States Congress Commendation. In 2003, Jim received the prestigious National Space Club Lifetime Achievement Award. After his retirement, his expertise has continued to be sought on projects in research and development stages.



Gaurav Sharma

Gaurav Sharma

Inducted in 2018

Gaurav Sharma is a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Department of Computer Science, and Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology at the University of Rochester. He is also a Distinguished Researcher in Center of Excellence in Data Science (CoE) at the Goergen Institute for Data Science. From 2008‐2010, he served as the Director for the Center for Emerging and Innovative Sciences, a New York state supported center for promoting joint university‐industry research and technology development, which is housed at the University of Rochester. From 1996 through 2003, he was with Xerox Research and Technology in Webster, New York as a Member of Research Staff, Principal Scientist and Project Leader. He received the Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from North Carolina State University, and his Master’s degrees in Applied Mathematics from NC State and Electrical Communication Engineering from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India. He received his bachelor of engineering degree in Electronics and Communication Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee.

Dr. Sharma is an IEEE Fellow, a Fellow of SPIE - the international society for optics and photonics, and a Fellow of the Society for Imaging Science and Technology. He is an elected member of Sigma Xi, and of the Phi Kappa Phi and Pi Mu Epsilon honor societies. Dr. Sharma is the Editor‐in‐Chief for the IEEE Transactions on Image Processing and has previously served as the Editor‐in‐Chief for the Journal of Electronic Imaging. He was the Chair and Co‐Chair, respectively, for the 2013 and 2012 IS&T/SPIE Electronic Imaging Symposia and Technical Program Co‐Chair for the 2012 and 2016 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing. He chairs the IEEE Conference Publications Committee, and serves on the IEEE Publication Services Product Board and on the IEEE Publication Services Product Board Strategic Planning Committee.



Anand Lal Shimpi

Anand Lal Shimpi

Inducted in 2016

Mr. Anand Lal Shimpi works in Hardware Technologies at Apple. Previously, when Mr. Shimpi was only 14 years old, he founded AnandTech.com. Today the site has millions of unique readers per month, and covers the entire spectrum of computing.

Mr. Shimpi earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Engineering from North Carolina State University in 2004. Mr. Shimpi’s story has been featured in numerous publications including USA Today, Fortune Small Business and on CBS’ 48 Hours.



Wesley E. Snyder

Wesley E. Snyder

Inducted in 2015

Wesley Snyder received his BSEE from North Carolina State University, and his MS and PhD from the University of Illinois. After serving in the US Air Force and the Peace Corps, he joined the NCSU Department of Electrical Engineering in 1976.

He was a Faculty Senator, chaired the University Research Committee, was Associate Head of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and was director of the Center for Advanced Computing and Communications.

Dr. Snyder is a Fellow of the IEEE and the American Institute of Medical and Biomedical Engineers (AIMBE). He has advised 28 MS and 24 PhD students, published over 150 technical papers and authored two books, the first textbook in robotics and a machine vision textbook, and holds three patents. He has applied his expertise to problems ranging from medical imaging to satellite tracking at General Electric, NASA, the German Space Agency, and the Bowman Gray School of Medicine and other organizations. He was a manager or co-manager of U.S. Army Research Office funding programs, including Systems and Controls and Information Assurance Systems.

He has served on IEEE journal editorial boards and organized or chaired numerous conferences including chairing the 2010 International Conference on Robotics and Automation. He was a founding member of the Robotics and Automation Council (now society).

Remember, you are an engineer. Solving problems is what you do. Also, anything, once understood, seems trivial.



Jim Stritzinger

Jim Stritzinger

Inducted in 2015

Jim Stritzinger currently serves as the Executive Director of Connect South Carolina, a non-profit that delivers broadband strategic planning and provides South Carolina’s only comprehensive broadband map. In addition to being a community leader and mentor, he is a successful technology entrepreneur with extensive experience in software development.

Stritzinger received his BS in Electrical Engineering from NC State University in 1986. While at NC State, Stritzinger spent several years at IBM and a summer with Schlumberger Offshore Services. His career path began at General Electric and continued to his family’s computer store, The Data Place, before launching a software company in 1990. Stritzinger’s company, ClearView Software, was acquired by Solomon Software in 1998 and later became part of Microsoft. In more recent years, he formed South Carolina’s private equity organization, SC Launch, directed the construction of a private data center, and has worked with a number of non-profits including FIRST Robotics and IT-oLogy. Because of his background of successful leadership, Stritzinger was selected to join the inaugural class of the prestigious Liberty Fellowship and become a member of the Aspen Global Leadership Network.

Stritzinger and his Wolfpack wife Laura (’85) live in Columbia, SC. They have three daughters. He is a competitive golfer, runner and triathlete, having completed Ironman 70.3 Miami in 2015.

The best advice I can share came from two legends. Author and former General Electric Vice-Chair Larry Bossidy told me to “Be humble” early in my career. In addition, I’ll never forget Jim Valvano imploring all of us to “Don’t give up … Don’t ever give up!



Robbie Troxler

Robbie Troxler

Inducted in 2018

Dr. Robert E. Troxler is a native of Raleigh NC. In 1983 he received a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from North Carolina State University. In 1986 and 1992 he received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology. During that period, he studied Electromagnetic Theory, Materials, and Optics. His research involving thin film superconducting microwave components led to a fellowship with NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center under the Graduate Student Researchers Program. At Marshall, Dr. Troxler worked in the Space Science Laboratory and conducted experiments on microwave circuits below 7 degrees Kelvin.
Dr. Troxler is now Director of Advanced Technologies at Troxler Electronic Laboratories in Research Triangle Park NC. Although his interests are broad, at Troxler he concentrates on Electromagnetics, optics, sensor design, acoustics, and applications of nuclear physics towards instrumented devices; typically used in the fields of geotechnical and civil engineering. He holds over 80 US and international patents.
Dr. Troxler has served on the Engineering Foundation and as a Strategic Advisor to the Electrical and Computer Engineering department at NCSU. He continues to mentor senior design projects and both graduate and undergraduate internships. He also supports the Troxler Senior Design Center and the Troxler Maker Space at the NCSU Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He is a member of the honor societies Eta Kappa Nu and Tau Beta Pi.



William F. Troxler

William F. Troxler

Inducted in 2015    Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award in 1985

William F. Troxler is a native North Carolinian who attended North Carolina State University on the GI Bill after serving in the U.S. Army Air Force during WWII. He received a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering in 1952.

Following his graduation, he worked for the U.S. Army Research Command in Ft. Belvoir, Virginia. It was here that he realized there was a great need for sophisticated testing equipment in the post war economic boom. He returned to Raleigh and after doing some post graduate work in electrical engineering, he started his own company. Beginning in the basement of his home in Raleigh, he pioneered the development and production of the nuclear testing and measuring devices used in the construction and agricultural industries. He also designed special devices for NASA, which were used in the first scientific satellites launched in the early 1960’s.

Under his direction, the company, Troxler Electronic Laboratories, Inc. grew from a one-man basement operation to its present size of 110,000 square feet and approximately 86 full-time employees. In addition to this facility, which is located in the Research Triangle Park, Troxler has offices in Germany, China, Canada and seven other U.S. cities.

Since the inception of his company in 1956, Mr. Troxler has been involved in innumerable activities and organizations in his industry and his community.

His past affiliations include: The Transportation Research Board, the American Society of Testing Materials, International Road Federation Board of Directors, Construction Industry Manufacturers Association, General Chairman International Conference on Industrial Radiation and Radioisotope Measurement Applications, National Research Council, Civil Engineering Research Foundation, Senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Governor’s Task Force on Science and Technology, Highway Innovation Steering Committee, Chairman of the North Carolina State University Engineering Advisory Council, President of the North Carolina World Trade Association – 1971-1972.

His awards include: 1985 Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award for North Carolina State University, 1972 President’s “E” Award for Outstanding Contribution to Export Expansion, 1981 Governor’s Award for Excellence in Exporting, Honor society of Phi Kappa Phi for outstanding engineering accomplishments.



Jim L.  Wall, II

Jim L. Wall, II

Inducted in 2018

James L. Wall, II is Director of Powertrain for 12-time NASCAR Cup Series Champions Hendrick Motorsports. He leads a team of 120 people that produce more than 600 engine builds annually. He oversees the engineering, manufacturing, development, production, track operations, transmission, driveshaft, and rear-gear groups.

At 18 years old, Jim began working with legendary engine builder Randy Dorton at Competition Engines. Jim received his B.S. in electrical engineering at NC State in 1985. He worked for the Hendrick Motorsports engine program as their first degreed engineer before finishing his M.S. in electrical engineering at NC State in 1988 with a concentration in Power Systems and Circuit Design and a minor in Mathematics.

After rejoining Hendrick Motorsports in 1989, Jim began his full time work on engines, dyno test systems, instrumentation, part design, analysis, and performance optimization. He founded the Information Technology group, implemented 3D CAD/CAM/CAE and PLM, started a Quality Control Metrology lab, integrated 5 axis CNC manufacturing operations, and implemented an Additive Manufacturing Lab. Jim plays a pivotal, hands- on role in developing and managing Hendrick Motorsports’ vital relationships with technical partners, including Chevrolet/GM Powertrain, Bosch, Siemens PLM, Haas Automation and Valvoline. He is a frequent keynote presenter at corporate events and conferences and has been featured in numerous publications for his expert insight into metrology, manufacturing, IT, PLM, and CAD/CAM/CAE.

During Jim’s 30-year tenure, Hendrick Motorsports has been awarded a NASCAR-leading 20 engine builder of the year awards. He has contributed to all 12 of the team’s Cup-level championships and its 15 NASCAR national series owner titles, which are both all-time records.

In 2003, Jim was presented with the Papa Joe Hendrick Award of Excellence, which is Hendrick Motorsports’ highest honor bestowed for significant contributions to the organization. Jim is on the advisory board of the Boys & Girls Club of Cabarrus County and serves at First Baptist Church in Concord, North Carolina.



J. Turner Whitted

J. Turner Whitted

Inducted in 2015    Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award in 2005

Turner Whitted joined NVIDIA in 2014 after 15 years at Microsoft Research where he founded the hardware devices group and managed the graphics group along with a variety of other groups devoted to HCI. He was a co-inventor of the signal processing algorithm for ClearTypeTM. He co-founded Numerical Design Limited in 1983 and served as president and technical director until 1996. Earlier, as a member of the technical staff at Bell Laboratories, he introduced recursive ray tracing as an implementation of global illumination. In his early career he designed digital test equipment, antenna measurement systems, and components of a sonar signal processor.

He earned BSE and MS degrees from Duke University and a PhD from North Carolina State University, all in electrical engineering. He is an adjunct research professor of Computer Science at the University of North Carolina and adjunct professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at North Carolina State University. In the past he has served on the editorial boards of IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications and ACM Transactions on Graphics, was papers chair for SIGGRAPH 97, and served on the SIGGRAPH executive committee. In 2005 he was named a Distinguished Engineering Alumnus by North Carolina State University and in 2013 received ACM SIGGRAPH’s Steven A. Coons Lifetime Achievement Award. He is an ACM Fellow and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.



Mary C. Whitton

Mary C. Whitton

Inducted in 2016

Ms. Mary C. Whitton made a life-changing pivot in 1976 when she left teaching middle-school math and entered NC State to study EE and computer graphics technology. Drawing on her two degrees from NC State, Master of Science ECE (1984) and Master of Science Guidance and Personnel Services (1974), Ms. Whitton has brought to her career a unique combination of system engineering and human factors expertise, along with managerial skills developed in industry and professional organizations.

Ms. Whitton was co-founder of two companies—Ikonas Graphics Systems (1978) and Trancept Systems (1986)—that produced leading-edge user-programmable hardware and software. The Ikonas and Trancept products were the direct predecessors of today’s General Purpose Graphics Processing Units (GPGPUs). Ms. Whitton designed the Ikonas Programmable Matrix Multiplier and sold systems into the seismic exploration, 3D medical imaging, remote sensing, computer animation, and scientific modeling and simulation markets. Ikonas and Trancept, respectively, were acquired by Adage, Inc. and Sun Microsystems where Ms. Whitton held Director of Technical Marketing positions.

In 1995, Ms. Whitton joined UNC Chapel Hill where she is Research Professor of Computer Science. Since 1998 she has co-led the Effective Virtual Environments research group investigating how technology, guided by knowledge of human perception, can make virtual reality experiences more effective. While a student, Ms. Whitton was active in the Society of Women Engineers. She is a member of ACM SIGGRAPH and a senior member of ACM and IEEE. She has held leadership roles in ACM including a term on ACM Council representing the 25+ Special Interest Groups (SIGS). She was a member of the SIGGRAPH Executive Committee for ten years, serving as President 1993-1995. For her broad engagement with SIGGRAPH as a technical contributor and leader of the organization, Ms. Whitton received the SIGGRAPH Outstanding Service Award in 2013.

Really listen to the people who are going to use the hardware and software you build so that you can do your work with an understanding of the task from the customer’s point-of-view.



Scot Wingo

Scot Wingo

Inducted in 2015    Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award in 2008

As Executive Chairman at ChannelAdvisor, Scot Wingo sets the strategic direction for the company, and works closely with the management team to align product direction with market trends. Scot is an industry thought leader, contributing regularly to several ChannelAdvisor blogs and speaking often at industry events.

Scot received a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Engineering from the University of South Carolina and a Master of Computer Engineering degree from North Carolina State University. Scot has received numerous awards including Ernst and Young’s Entrepreneur of the Year and Triangle Business Journal’s Businessperson of the Year.

My advice to students today: Success is a series of choices that are entirely in your hands. Don’t accept the status quo. Instead, take the unconventional path and "May the force be with you!



David R.  Wooten

David R. Wooten

Inducted in 2018

David R. Wooten entered NC State University after serving in the US Air Force and received his BS in Electrical Engineering in 1974. While an EE undergrad, he worked in Professor John Staudhammer's graphics research lab and co-authored (with PhD student Jeff Eastman) a SIGGRAPH paper entitled "A general purpose, expandable processor for real-time computer graphics.”

In 1976, after jobs in microprocessor and graphics hardware, David joined Mostek as Senior Applications Engineer closely involved with DRAM development. This led to his becoming the first employee at newly formed Inmos Corp in 1978. There David developed a number of DRAM techniques that became industry standards (nibble mode, CAS-before-RAS refresh, folded bit line memory cell architecture) as well as designing the world's fastest DRAMs. The DRAM cell architecture that David developed has been used in every DRAM manufactured in the last 40 years. David received three patents on his work at Inmos, and he was an influential contributor to many JEDEC DRAM standards.

After leading start-up teams in several companies from 1983 to 1990, David joined Compaq Corporation, advancing to Compaq Fellow and guiding new technology development. He was extremely active in the development of industry standards, including Chair of the IEEE 1394b standards group and the 1394 Trade Association. David was principal architect for USB 1.0, USB 1.1, and USB 2.0. In 2000-2003, he continued his work in this field as a Vice President at Cypress Semiconductor and led the work on the OHCI standards for both USB and 1394.

In 2003, David joined Microsoft Corporation and worked extensively with Intel and AMD on virtualization and security issues until his retirement in 2016. David represented Microsoft on the Board of Directors and Technical Committee of the Trusted Computing Group, and was architect and specification editor for the Trusted Platform Module 2.0 (ISO/IEC 11889). David became a partner at Microsoft and received over 16 patents for his work in virtualization and security hardware.



Steven A. Wright

Steven A. Wright

Inducted in 2016

Dr. Steven A. Wright helped create the concept of virtualized network functions. He currently chairs the End User Advisory Group at OPNFV and previously chaired the ETSI NFV ISG where he also initiated the Proof of Concept program. Over 30 years and 4 different countries, his career has involved research, development, program management, product management, university faculty and board roles with companies including Plessey, GTE, Alcatel, Fujitsu, BellSouth and AT&T. He has produced 50+ patents and a number of diverse publications and served as guest editor for IEEE Communications and IEEE Network Magazines. He has presented his research at international conferences in Europe, Asia, Australia and the USA; founded the IEEE NFV SDN conference and serves on other conference committees.

Dr. Wright’s degrees include B.Eng (Elec) from U. Southern Queensland, M.B.A. from Arizona State University, M.S. (C.I.S.) from Boston University, PhD (Computer Engineering) from North Carolina State University and J.D. from Georgia State University. His awards include Cali Award in Business Tax, ATIS award for outstanding contributions to an ATIS Forum or Committee, Distinguished Paper Award Opnetwork Conference, ATM Forum Spotlight Award, and a BSA/NESA Scoutmaster Award of Merit. Dr. Wright is a member of the State Bar of Georgia.



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